Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I run this code:

var Test = function() {
    return this.stuff;
};

Test.stuff = 'Neat!';

document.write(Test() || 'Not neat.');

Why do I get 'Not neat.'? Why can't I access the stuff property using this.stuff?

share|improve this question
5  
What are you really trying to do here? –  hugomg Nov 12 '11 at 3:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

While other people have posted why this occurs (the understanding of this is incorrect), here is one solution which will work reliably.

Update: As Raynos noted, when using strict mode functions in ECMAScript 5th Edition, it is invalid to use arguments.callee (it will throw a TypeError). Thus caution should be exercised if using this approach. (When using a [correct] ECMAScript 5th edition engine, there is no reason to use arguments.callee over the name given to the function which is bound to the new scope -- see the end of the answer.)

var Test = function() {
   // arguments.callee is the current function, if any
   return arguments.callee.stuff
}
Test.stuff = 'Neat!'
alert(Test() || 'Not neat.') // Neat!

Another is to use a closure:

var Test = (function () {
  function fn () {
    // closure over fn, which names this function-object
    return fn.stuff
  }
  fn.stuff = 'Neat!' // here
  return fn          // do not combine with function declaration!
})()
Test.stuff = 'Neat!' // or here
alert(Test() || 'Not neat.') // Neat!

Or, a closure over a variable directly:

var Test = (function () {
  var stuff = 'Neat!'
  return function () {
    // variable closure, no property
    return stuff
  }
})()
alert(Test() || 'Not neat.') // Neat!

Or... so many ways.

Happy coding.


Another approach that was pointed out by Aadit M Shah is to use the function identifier to refer to the current function:

var Test = function Temp () {
   return Temp.stuff
}
Test.stuff = 'Neat!'
alert(Test() || 'Not neat.') // Neat! (But see below.)

As Aadit points out, this is valid, as per the ECMAScript 5th edition specification, page 99:

The Identifier in a FunctionExpression can be referenced from inside the FunctionExpression's FunctionBody to allow the function to call itself recursively. However, unlike in a FunctionDeclaration, the Identifier in a FunctionExpression cannot be referenced from and does not affect the scope enclosing the FunctionExpression.

However, some browsers (at least IE9) implements this incorrectly (and I am not sure if the above noted behavior is well-defined in the 3rd edition). Consider:

var x = function y () { return y }; y = 42; x();

In IE9 it will yield 42 and in FF8 it will yield the function-object. IE9 is incorrect here as it introduces y as a variable in the enclosing scope, which is forbidden by ECMAScript for function expressions. Here is an in-context example of how this incorrect implementation can lead to different results:

var Test = function Temp () {
   return Temp.stuff
}
Test.stuff = "Neat!"
Temp = {}
alert(Test() || 'Not neat.') // 'Not neat.' in IE9, 'Neat!' in FF8
share|improve this answer
    
What would be the difference between using arguments.callee and just repeating the function name directly? –  hugomg Nov 12 '11 at 4:28
1  
@missingno Preference? :) I have used both, depending on what I wanted to do and how "it fit" with the rest of the code. I cannot come up with a "universal" advantage or disadvantage either way off the top my head, but I would not be surprised if I was overlooking something. Just be careful to not to be "too clever"... Note that is is different from var Test = function () { return Test.stuff } in a global-context because Test might really be window.Test, a property, and not a closed-over variable. Someone might break things later with Test = function(){} ... never know :) –  user166390 Nov 12 '11 at 4:32
    
I don't like to use arguments.callee. Neither do I like to use var Test = function () { return Test.stuff; };. Both are slow methods to access data. This is because callee is a method of arguments, and the interpreter spends more time accessing it. Similarly, Test does not exist within the local scope. Hence the interpreter must travel upwards to locate it in a parent scope. Instead, I prefer the following method: var Test = function Temp() { return Temp.stuff; };. Here Temp is an alias for Test and it exists within the local scope. It's a faster and a more elegant solution. ;) –  Aadit M Shah Nov 13 '11 at 4:43
    
@AaditMShah Shah Claims of "slow methods" rejected: It Just Doesn't Matter. List to Donald Knuth -- he is right about this topic. As far as "speed": a smart JavaScript engine can entirely eliminate scope traversal as it can be eliminated while preserving all the required semantics and, even with a dumb JavaScript engine, the relative cost is insignificant for most practical purposed. Willing to accept jsperf performance test-cases, bearing in mind they are micro-benchmarks. –  user166390 Nov 13 '11 at 5:35
    
@pst - Speed Up Your Javascript - GoogleTechTalks - Nicholas C. Zakas. BTW what does Donald Knuth have to do with this? –  Aadit M Shah Nov 13 '11 at 5:42

This is what you have done:

var Test = function() {                //Test is a Function object
    return this.stuff;                 //this is a pointer to an object, not Test
};

Test.stuff = 'Neat!';                  //Add a property to Test

document.write(Test() || 'Not neat.'); //this has no property stuff

Change the last line of your code to:

document.write(Test.call(Test) || 'Not neat.'); //this now points to Test

The reason your code didn't work is because the this pointer points:

  1. The instance of the constructor created when the function call is prefixed with the new keyword. (e.g. var foo = new Foo(); //the this in Foo points to foo [for the sake of explanation]).
  2. The object passed to the call and apply functions as the first parameter.

What you want to do instead is something like:

var Test = function Temp() {           //Test is a Function object, alias Temp
    return Temp.stuff;                 //Temp is the same as Test, only locally
};

Test.stuff = 'Neat!';                  //Add a property to Test

document.write(Test() || 'Not neat.'); //writes Neat!

Upvote this answer if you liked it. Cheers.

share|improve this answer

Class methods and variables go on the prototype property:

Test.prototype.stuff = 'Neat!'

Constructor functions (I'm assuming this is what you want, given the capital case and the this) should be invoked with the new operator:

new Test()

and they should not return a value (you should instead use the default that returns this)

function Test(){
    this.instanceVariable = 17;
    //no return!
}

As for your real need , you can just access the function and its properties directly then

function Test(){
    return Test.stuff;
}

However I am not a big fan of abusing functions for namespaces like that. I prefer to have a namespace object for doing things

//in a real case I would probably use the module pattern for private variables
//but whatever...

var Namespace = {};

Namespace.stuff = 'Neat!';

Namespace.F = function(){
    console.log(Namespace.stuff);
};
share|improve this answer
    
I actually want to use the class like the jQuery object (without instantiating): Test('Do something'); Test.default = 500; Test('Do something with 500.') –  AlicanC Nov 12 '11 at 3:50
2  
@AlicanC heres a post by John Resig on the topic. ejohn.org/blog/simple-class-instantiation –  danem Nov 12 '11 at 4:03
    
@Pete that post is nice but it's from 2007. I can't find a single usage of arguments.calee in jQuery 1.7's source code now. Maybe they have moved to a new method? I can't seem to figure it out. –  AlicanC Nov 12 '11 at 4:53
2  
@AlicanC - From what I understand, what you're really looking for is a pattern like the one I described in my answer (i.e. var Test = function Temp() { return Temp.stuff; };). It's fast, and it's elegant. Plus, even if people later change the code like Test = 5;, it will not break your code as the internal name of the function (i.e. Temp), still points to the function itself. It can't be modified from outside. Hope this helps. Cheers. –  Aadit M Shah Nov 13 '11 at 5:07

You called Test from the global context, so this refers to the global object, so this.stuff refers to the global variable stuff which is undefined which is falsy. This is why you saw "Not neat."

You can make it show Neat! like this:

See http://jsfiddle.net/aYh5y/

window.stuff = 'Neat!';
var Test = function() {
    return this.stuff;
};
alert(Test() || 'Not neat.');

ADDENDUM

Here is a way you can make this work as an enclosing object:

var Test = function () {
    return this.stuff;
};

var example = {
    g: Test,
    stuff: "Pretty neat"
};

alert(example.g() || 'Not neat.');

Here we're calling Test through a target object.

http://jsfiddle.net/aYh5y/1/

share|improve this answer

The stuff property is assigned to the function, but read from the global this ... The two are seperate entities

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.