Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Using HTTP authentication with libcurl in C for Twitter Streaming

I was able to write a C code that receives a stream of Tweets from streaming API. But the stream is not being put out (no output) by the code below. The code works when CURLOPT_URL is set to google.com or 9gag.com. I guess the problem has something to do with the steady stream of tweets with tremendous received data. The write_func callback function, which purpose is to print the response (stream), might not be working that is why there is no output? I am thinking that the callback function probably is being overwhelmed by the tremendous stream sent by Twitter API. Then if this is the case, how should I write the proper write callback function?

You might ask. I verified that the reception of stream is working because I watch my System Monitor's network history rise on received bytes whenever I execute the code.

Thanks!

The code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <curl/curl.h>

struct string {
  char *ptr;
  size_t len;
};

void init_string(struct string *s) {
  s->len = 0;
  s->ptr = malloc(s->len+1);
  if (s->ptr == NULL) {
    fprintf(stderr, "malloc() failed\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  s->ptr[0] = '\0';
}

size_t writefunc(void *ptr, size_t size, size_t nmemb, struct string *s)
{
  size_t new_len = s->len + size*nmemb;

  s->ptr = realloc(s->ptr, new_len+1);
  if (s->ptr == NULL) {

    fprintf(stderr, "realloc() failed\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  memcpy(s->ptr+s->len, ptr, size*nmemb);
  s->ptr[new_len] = '\0';
  s->len = new_len;

  return size*nmemb;
}

int main(void)
{
  CURL *curl;
  CURLcode res;

  curl = curl_easy_init();
  if(curl) {
    struct string s;
    init_string(&s);

    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_URL, "https://stream.twitter.com/1/statuses/sample.json");
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_USERPWD, "neilmarion:password_here");
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEFUNCTION, writefunc);
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEDATA, &s); 
    res = curl_easy_perform(curl);

    printf("%s\n", s.ptr);
    free(s.ptr);

    /* always cleanup */
    curl_easy_cleanup(curl);
  }
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Kev Nov 12 '11 at 14:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer 1

OK, I did some testing and it appears that URL just keeps sending data, it doesn't seem to complete. I killed it off after 15M. But if you put print statements in your callback or use strace you can see its working properly. Your string s just keeps growing and growing.

So one solution would be to change you callback to print and re-initialse s once it reaches a certain size. Otherwise it looks like the program will eventually run out of memory. So change your callback to be

size_t max_buffer = 10240;  // 10K
size_t writefunc(void *ptr, size_t size, size_t nmemb, struct string *s)
{
  size_t new_len = s->len + size*nmemb;

  s->ptr = realloc(s->ptr, new_len+1);
  if (s->ptr == NULL) {
    fprintf(stderr, "realloc() failed\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  memcpy(s->ptr+s->len, ptr, size*nmemb);
  s->ptr[new_len] = '\0';
  s->len = new_len;
  // Begin newly added code
  if( s->len >= max_buffer )
  {
    printf("%s", s->ptr);
    fflush( stdout );
    free(s->ptr);
    initString( s );
  }
  // End newly added code
  return size*nmemb;
}

And still keep the print at the end. To dump the last bit and the trailing newline. Now that you have a buffered solution you could look at a more efficient implementation which doesn't need dynamically added memory.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly. It will not end. Thanks for confirming that the callback function is not suitable for the said purpose. If you have an idea could you post the right callback function? Thanks. –  neilmarion Nov 12 '11 at 7:11
1  
added example callback code –  Sodved Nov 12 '11 at 7:20
1  
It might be easy to use a memory mapped file, which could give you a few gb of storage at the cost of speed or split up the steam into chunks (what we did for a project that uses this) and dispatch them for processing on-the-fly. –  Necrolis Nov 12 '11 at 8:22
    
This was actually what I was looking for. Thanks @Sodved! –  neilmarion Nov 16 '11 at 3:30
    
@Necrolis What you said is actually what I am designing. This code above will be the one that will split up the stream into chunks for processing by another program. –  neilmarion Nov 16 '11 at 3:58

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.