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I'm learning PHP,MySQL and came across this function today

function get_director($director_id) {
global $db;
$query = 'SELECT 
        people_fullname 
   FROM
       people
   WHERE
       people_id = ' . $director_id;
$result = mysql_query($query, $db) or die(mysql_error($db));

$row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result);
extract($row);

return $people_fullname;
}

I understand what functions are and I've created a few while learning PHP.But this one is a bit more complicated.I can't understand the

WHERE people_id = ' . $director_id

I guess the single quote ends the MySQL statement? And then it is concatenated with the argument?

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To avoid Sql Injection you should addSlashes($director_id) –  Yzmir Ramirez Nov 12 '11 at 6:22
1  
@YzmirRamirez it won't help –  Your Common Sense Nov 12 '11 at 6:23
2  
mysql_real_escape_string(). Not addSlashes. –  Michael B Nov 12 '11 at 9:45
    
@KyleBoddy, that's right, I haven't used a non-PDO in a while. –  Yzmir Ramirez Nov 12 '11 at 17:17

4 Answers 4

Yes you are right, the single quotes end the sql string and concatenate with the supplied argument. Same case if you want to print the value out.

echo 'This is the director ID :'.$director_id;
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I wouldn't call this operator an "SQL statement". And wouldn't say it is "closed" either.
For PHP it's just a string with no particular meaning.
And the quote ends this string literal, not SQL statement.

Strictly speaking here is just a concatenation, a string literal with a variable.

Having a whole complete SQL statement as a result.

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Would you please tell me what that $query variable actually does?To be specific,what does the WHERE people_id = ' . $director_id; part of the code do?What's the condition to pull data from people_fullname –  NissGTR Nov 12 '11 at 6:42
    
better ask this as a separate question. Just post this query without PHP, only the query itself without surrounding quotes(make it with people_id = 1 to make it consistent) –  Your Common Sense Nov 12 '11 at 6:48
    
I just want to know the meaning of that WHERE clause.Should I post a separate thread for that? –  NissGTR Nov 12 '11 at 6:56
    
yes, exactly. this question has nothing to do with PHP and functions. If you have a question about SQL - ask it separately –  Your Common Sense Nov 12 '11 at 7:43

The .(dot) is used for concatenation in php.
If you pass 32 to $director_id then the final query will be
select people_name from people where people_id = 32
If you pass 43 to $director_id then the final query will be
select people_name from people where people_id = 43

Means the .(dot) is used for appending the value of $director_id to the string in single quotes.

The final query will be passed to mysql. Using .(dot) is just a method in php to generate the final query that we want to execute in mysql.

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I guess the single quote ends the MySQL statement?And then it is concatenated with the argument? Please help me out.

That is correct.

http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.string.php

<?php
$a = "Hello ";
$b = $a . "World!"; // now $b contains "Hello World!"

$a = "Hello ";
$a .= "World!";     // now $a contains "Hello World!"
?>

EDIT: The meaning of the WHERE clause is best explained by the psuedo explanation of what the entire statement does.

SELECT everyone's full name WHERE their people_id is EQUAL TO some value passed into the function.

However, you are way over your head if you are evaluating these things and don't understand the basic SQL. I recommend you read the entire Tiztag PHP/MySQL tutorial.

http://www.tizag.com/mysqlTutorial/

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Please tell me what's the meaning of that WHERE clause in the code. –  NissGTR Nov 12 '11 at 7:13
    
Edit added. Please evaluate, upvote/accept. –  Michael B Nov 12 '11 at 9:45

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