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Basically this is what i want to do:

<?php
  class App {
    public $var = "main-class";
    public function load() {
      $this->var =  "child-class";
      $child = new Child;
      $child->echo_var();
    }
  }
  class Child extends App {
    public function echo_var() {
       echo $this->var;
    }
  }

  $app = new Child;
  $app->load();
?>

It outputs "main-class", i want it to output "child-class" without having to modify the child class (because i want it to be sort of a "clean" and dynamic class).

I accept suggestions for another course of action

PS: This is part of an Small MVC Framework i'm trying to develop.

share|improve this question
    
This doesn't seem quite right. To be able to suggest another course of action, you must provide a bit of context. What exactly does load() do? –  Vikk Nov 12 '11 at 6:40
    
i have a sort of global var named "models", it's initialised like this: public $models = array(); and i have a function that populates that array according to classes used in the current controller, $this->uses_class("Thumbnail"); which acts on the models, adding to the array... before calling the child class, the array is populated well with the classes that i add, but after, the $models var resets to array() –  George Ariton Nov 12 '11 at 8:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are two ways that you could do this. Both are going to need to use constructors. With the first one, the child will declare itself when created

<?php
class App {
    public $var = "main-class";

    public function __construct($var=null) {
        if($var !== null) {
            $this->var = $var;
        }
    }

    public function load() {
        $child = new Child ();
        $child->echo_var();
    }
}

class Child extends App {
    public function __construct(){
        parent::__construct("child-class");
    }

    public function echo_var() {
        echo $this->var;
    }
}

$app = new Child();
$app->load();
?>

The second one allows the parent to declare the name of the child.

<?php
class App {
    public $var = "main-class";

    public function __construct($var=null) {
        if($var !== null) {
            $this->var = $var;
        }
    }

    public function load() {
        $child = new Child ("child-class");
        $child->echo_var();
    }
}

class Child extends App {
    public function echo_var() {
        echo $this->var;
    }
}

$app = new Child();
$app->load();
?>

Both of those examples work and do what you want, I believe.

share|improve this answer

This isn't how inheritance works - By creating a new Child object, its data members are all initialized with their default values. When you do $this->var = "" in the parent class, you're setting the data members for the $app object, not the $child object.

You can modify the child class to incorporate a constructor that accepts parameters, and that constructor would set its data members properly. To achieve something similar to what you want, you can use constructors:

<?php
  class App {
    public $var = "main-class";
    public function __construct() {
      $this->var =  "child-class";
    }
    public function load() {
      $child = new Child;
      $child->echo_var();
    }
  }
  class Child extends App {
    public function __construct()
    {
      parent::__construct();
    }
    public function echo_var() {
       echo $this->var;
    }
  }

  $app = new App;
  $app->load();
share|improve this answer

I find it very strange that your parent class instanciates it's child. Generally, you would instanciate the child, and you get all the functionality of the parent.

$app = new Child();
$app->load();

The problem is that you actually have 2 different instanciations. You have an object of App and it's holding a separate object of Child.

The other way to do this would be to make $var a static variable and then it would be available independent of the instantiation. I don't generally recommend making properties static though. It's generally considered bad form (for numerous reasons).

share|improve this answer
    
you are right, sorry! It was just a typo... But still, same outcome. –  George Ariton Nov 12 '11 at 7:10

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