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Snippet 1:

<% _message.InnerText = this.GetType().ToString(); %>
<h3>Page type: <span id=_message runat=server/></h3>

Snippet 2:

<h3>Page type: <span id=_message runat=server/></h3>
<% _message.InnerText = this.GetType().ToString(); %>

1 gives me the expected output, but 2 gives me nothing.

Why?

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3  
its because in Snippet 2, the span is ALREADY rendered thats why any changes made to that control will only take effect on the next postback, while in Snippet 1 is vice-versa. –  vhinn terrible Nov 12 '11 at 8:39
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2 Answers

As someone pointed out in the comments it's because the span tag is already rendered and delivered to the browser before your code executes. However I believe if you set the Response.Buffer flag to true they will both behave the same. Put this line of code at the top of your page:

<% Response.Buffer = true; %>

(I'm just guessing here. I haven't tested this because the situation is one you should avoid to begin with.)

Interestingly enough I believe your demonstration is one of many great examples of why inline code is just a bad idea. It's an approach that ultimately does not mesh well with how web servers and web browsers behave.

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Thanks. I tried to set Response.Buffer=true. Not working. –  smwikipedia Nov 12 '11 at 12:54
    
The Responser.Buffer determines wheter to buffer the output until a complete reponse is ready. It's irrelevant to the rendnering sequence of the page controls. –  smwikipedia Nov 12 '11 at 12:58
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just as Linus said, "Read the f*** source code." So I decompile the code and got this:

for 1.

// ASP.default_aspx
private void __Renderform1(HtmlTextWriter __w, Control parameterContainer)
{
    __w.Write("\r\n    ");
    parameterContainer.Controls[0].RenderControl(__w);
    __w.Write("\r\n    start\r\n        <h3>Page type:");
    parameterContainer.Controls[1].RenderControl(__w);
    __w.Write("</h3>\r\n        ");
    this._message.InnerText = base.GetType().ToString();
    __w.Write("\r\n    end\r\n    ");
}

for 2.

// ASP.default_aspx
private void __Renderform1(HtmlTextWriter __w, Control parameterContainer)
{
    __w.Write("\r\n    ");
    parameterContainer.Controls[0].RenderControl(__w);
    __w.Write("\r\n    start\r\n        ");
    this._message.InnerText = base.GetType().ToString();
    __w.Write("\r\n        <h3>Page type:");
    parameterContainer.Controls[1].RenderControl(__w); // Here the change has no effect.
    __w.Write("</h3>\r\n    end\r\n    ");
}

So, there're 2 key points:

  1. The ASP.NET parser render the whole page in a from-top-to-bottom fashion, literally.

  2. The confusion arise from my traditionl experience with the desktop application.

For Desktop apps, it's like: Code -> Memeory -> UI

For ASP.NET apps, it's like: Code -> Memory ->Ouput Buffer-> UI

In the snippet 2, the change does happen for Code -> Memory step, but it didn't get chance to propgate to the Output Buffer, and thus nothing changed on the ultimate UI.

So the root cause is we have an extra stage before we reach the UI for ASP.NET apps.

I hope I make myself clear.

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Try to edit your post and answer it. Don't update the answer in your question. –  bharath Nov 14 '11 at 11:43
    
Thanks for reminding. It's done. –  smwikipedia Nov 14 '11 at 11:58
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