Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've been working through a tutorial on common lisp, and I've just been introduced to incf and dolist , I wanted to see if I properly understood how dolist functions by making a function inc-list that would increment every element of a list by one:

(defvar a-list (list 1 2 3))

(inc-list a-list) => (2 3 4)

Here is how I defined inc-list

(defun inc-list (list)
  (progn 
    (dolist (element list)
      (incf element))
    list))

This doesn't seem to work. when I try (inc-list a-list) I get back (1 2 3) and a-list => (1 2 3). This wouldn't bother me as much if it weren't for the fact that doing :

(incf (car a-list))
(incf (cadr a-list))
(incf (caddr a-list))

gives me a-list => (2 3 4). Is there some secret to what element means?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

element is bound to each of the elements of the list, in turn, i.e. the value of the car of each pair is in a sense "copied" to it. Then, incf is called on element, incrementing that variable's value, but not the list position that it was taken from. It's as if you're doing

(defvar element (car a-list))
(incf element)
(setq element (cadr a-list))
(incf element)
(setq element (caddr a-list))
(incf element)

Here too, element is incremented and then immediately "forgotten" each time because it's setq'd to a new value. By contrast, (incf (car a-list)) increments the car of a-list in-place. If you want that behavior in a loop, then forget about dolist and loop on the list instead:

(loop for position on lst
      do (incf (car position)))
share|improve this answer
(defvar a-list (list 1 2 3))

Side note: Don't write global variables like this. Write *a-list*. Otherwise the global dynamic variable influences your local variables.

(defun inc-list (list)
  (progn 
    (dolist (element list)
      (incf element))
    list))

You don't need PROGN. DEFUN already allows a sequence of forms, as does DOLIST.

(defun inc-list (list)
  (dolist (element list)
    (incf element))
  list)

Above is sufficient.

DOLIST is a form which introduces a new (!) local variable called ELEMENT.

DOLIST sets the value of ELEMENT in each iteration. All you do is incrementing the value of ELEMENT in each iteration step. Your side effect is lost. The original LIST is not changed. The value of ELEMENT is otherwise not used.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.