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LINQ analogues in Scala

I am looking for chart which shows equivalents in Scala of LINQ methods for IEnumerable:

  • First is head
  • Select is map
  • SingleOrDefault is ... (I don't know)
  • ... and so on

Does anyone know anything of such "translate" table?

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marked as duplicate by casperOne Jun 26 '12 at 15:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Why settle for anything less than LINQ for Scala (full API re-implementation): github.com/nicholas22/propelS –  Scooterville Jun 9 '12 at 21:25
1  
@casperOne: Why not merge the two threads? –  missingfaktor Jul 22 '12 at 11:27
2  
This question is nowhere near being a duplicate of the other one. This question is much more focused and concrete, whereas the other one is vaguer. Both are valid and different. –  Mauricio Scheffer Jul 23 '12 at 22:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 66 down vote accepted

I am only listing out the equivalents of functions from Enumerable<A>. This is incomplete as of now. I will try to update this later with more.

xs.Aggregate(accumFunc) -> xs.reduceLeft(accumFunc)
xs.Aggregate(seed, accumFunc) -> xs.foldLeft(seed)(accumFunc)
xs.Aggregate(seed, accumFunc, trans) -> trans(xs.foldLeft(seed)(accumFunc))
xs.All(pred) -> xs.forall(pred)
xs.Any() -> xs.nonEmpty
xs.Any(pred) -> xs.exists(pred)
xs.AsEnumerable() -> xs.asTraversable // roughly
xs.Average() -> xs.sum / xs.length
xs.Average(trans) -> trans(xs.sum / xs.length)
xs.Cast<A>() -> xs.map(_.asInstanceOf[A])
xs.Concat(ys) -> xs ++ ys
xs.Contains(x) -> xs.contains(x) //////
xs.Contains(x, eq) -> xs.exists(eq(x, _))
xs.Count() -> xs.size
xs.Count(pred) -> xs.count(pred)
xs.DefaultIfEmpty() -> if(xs.isEmpty) List(0) else xs // Use `mzero` (from Scalaz) instead of 0 for more genericity
xs.DefaultIfEmpty(v) -> if(xs.isEmpty) List(v) else xs
xs.Distinct() -> xs.distinct
xs.ElementAt(i) -> xs(i)
xs.ElementAtOrDefault(i) -> xs.lift(i).orZero // `orZero` is from Scalaz
xs.Except(ys) -> xs.diff(ys)
xs.First() -> xs.head
xs.First(pred) -> xs.find(pred) // returns an `Option`
xs.FirstOrDefault() -> xs.headOption.orZero
xs.FirstOrDefault(pred) -> xs.find(pred).orZero
xs.GroupBy(f) -> xs.groupBy(f)
xs.GroupBy(f, g) -> xs.groupBy(f).mapValues(_.map(g))
xs.Intersect(ys) -> xs.intersect(ys)
xs.Last() -> xs.last
xs.Last(pred) -> xs.reverseIterator.find(pred) // returns an `Option`
xs.LastOrDefault() -> xs.lastOption.orZero
xs.LastOrDefault(pred) -> xs.reverseIterator.find(pred).orZero
xs.Max() -> xs.max
xs.Max(f) -> xs.maxBy(f)
xs.Min() -> xs.min
xs.Min(f) -> xs.minBy(f)
xs.OfType<A>() -> xs.collect { case x: A => x }
xs.OrderBy(f) -> xs.sortBy(f)
xs.OrderBy(f, comp) -> xs.sortBy(f)(comp) // `comp` is an `Ordering`.
xs.OrderByDescending(f) -> xs.sortBy(f)(implicitly[Ordering[A]].reverse)
xs.OrderByDescending(f, comp) -> xs.sortBy(f)(comp.reverse)
Enumerable.Range(start, count) -> start until start + count
Enumerable.Repeat(x, times) -> Iterator.continually(x).take(times)
xs.Reverse() -> xs.reverse
xs.Select(trans) -> xs.map(trans) // For indexed overload, first `zipWithIndex` and then `map`.
xs.SelectMany(trans) -> xs.flatMap(trans)
xs.SequenceEqual(ys) -> xs.sameElements(ys)
xs.Skip(n) -> xs.drop(n)
xs.SkipWhile(pred) -> xs.dropWhile(pred)
xs.Sum() -> xs.sum
xs.Sum(f) -> xs.map(f).sum // or `xs.foldMap(f)`. Requires Scalaz.
xs.Take(n) -> xs.take(n)
xs.TakeWhile(pred) -> xs.takeWhile(pred)
xs.OrderBy(f).ThenBy(g) -> xs.sortBy(x => (f(x), g(x))) // Or: xs.sortBy(f &&& g). `&&&` is from Scalaz.
xs.ToArray() -> xs.toArray // Use `xs.toIndexedSeq` for immutable indexed sequence.
xs.ToDictionary(f) -> xs.map(f.first).toMap // `first` is from Scalaz. When f = identity, you can just write `xs.toMap`.
xs.ToList() -> xs.toList // This returns an immutable list. Use `xs.toBuffer` if you want a mutable list.
xs.Union(ys) -> xs.union(ys)
xs.Where(pred) -> xs.filter(pred)
xs.Zip(ys, f) -> (xs, ys).zipped.map(f) // When f = identity, use `xs.zip(ys)`.

There is no direct equivalent of some functions, but it's fairly easy to roll your own. Here are some such functions.

Single:

def single[A](xs: Traversable[A]): A = {
  if(xs.isEmpty) sys error "Empty sequence!"
  else if(xs.size > 1) sys error "More than one elements!"
  else xs.head
}

SingleOrDefault:

def singleOrDefault[A : Zero](xs: Traversable[A]): A = {
  if(xs.isEmpty) mzero
  else if(xs.size > 1) sys error "More than one elements!"
  else xs.head
}

Join:

def join[A, B, K, R](outer: Traversable[A], inner: Traversable[B])
    (outKey: A => K, inKey: B => K, f: (A, B) => R): Traversable[R] = {
  for(o <- outer; i <- inner; if outKey(o) == inKey(i)) yield f(o, i)
}

GroupJoin:

def groupJoin[A, B, K, R](outer: Traversable[A], inner: Traversable[B])
    (outKey: A => K, inKey: B => K, f: (A, Traversable[B]) => R): Traversable[R] = {
  for(o <- outer) yield {
    val zs = for(i <- inner; if outKey(o) == inKey(i)) yield i
    f(o, zs)
  }
}

Notes:

  1. In idiomatic Scala, total functions are generally preferred over partial functions. So, idiomatic implementation of single and singleOrDefault would produce a value of type Either[Exception, A] instead of A. For example, here is refined implementation of single that returns Either[Exception, A].

    def single[A](xs: Traversable[A]): Either[Exception, A] = {
      if(xs.isEmpty) Left(new RuntimeException("Empty sequence!"))
      else if(xs.size > 1) Left(new RuntimeException("More than one elements!"))
      else Right(xs.head)
    }
    
  2. Scalaz's Zero/mzero are not quite same as C#'s default value mechanism. For details, you can refer to this post I wrote on this topic some time back.

  3. You can use enrich-my-library pattern to achieve the same effect as C#'s extension methods. Refer to this and this for details.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you VERY much!!! When updating, if there is no 1:1 mapping, please just put it as "no 1:1" mapping, thank you in advance. –  greenoldman Nov 12 '11 at 20:30
    
The third Aggregate is incorrect. trans(xs.foldLeft(seed)(accumFunc)) is proper. –  Daniel C. Sobral Nov 12 '11 at 21:49
    
@missingfaktor: Would it be possible to use that list for docs.scala-lang.org? –  soc Nov 12 '11 at 23:26
    
start to start + count - 1 => start until start + count –  soc Nov 12 '11 at 23:35
3  
This is incredibly helpful. They must a create an ISO standard for collection APIs. –  Dmitry Ornatsky Feb 8 '12 at 11:59

I don't know anything about C# or LINQ, but is this what you're looking for?

scala> val l = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
l: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

scala> l.head
res0: Int = 1

scala> l.headOption
res1: Option[Int] = Some(1)

scala> l.map(_.toString)
res2: List[java.lang.String] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

scala> l(1)
res3: Int = 2

There's no method to get an element or a default, but this will work:

scala> scala.util.control.Exception.allCatch.opt(l(5)) getOrElse 0
res4: Int = 0
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you but I am looking for complete LINQ -> Scala translation, so I could mentally be on right track faster. Something to print, read and memorize. –  greenoldman Nov 12 '11 at 16:05
1  
For that last one, you could have done l.lift(5).getOrElse(0). –  missingfaktor Nov 12 '11 at 18:05

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