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My algorithm is pretty simple. Add an item to a cache. The item is stored in both an NSMutableArray and an NSMutableDictionary. The array serves as a FIFO queue, where if I pass a specified maximum size, I delete the oldest items until the size is lower than the allowed maximum.

When I remove an item, I first remove if from the array, and then from the dictionary. Then I have problems because the item seems to be over-released (so says the debugger, i.e. "does not appear to point to a valid object").

- (void) addItem:(NSData *)value forKey:(NSString *)key {
    ApiResponseCacheItem *item = [[ApiResponseCacheItem alloc] init];
    item.cacheKey = key;
    item.cacheValue = value;

    [queue addObject:item];
    [item release];
    [dictionary setObject:item forKey:key];

    size += [value length];

    while (size > kMaxCacheSize && [queue count] > 0) {
        ApiResponseCacheItem *oldestItem = [queue objectAtIndex:0];
        size -= [oldestItem.cacheValue length];
        // remove oldest item
        [queue removeObjectAtIndex:0];
        [dictionary removeObjectForKey:oldestItem.cacheKey];
    }
}

Now, I change the order: first I remove the object from the dictionary, and then from the array, leaving everything else exactly the same. Now all is fine.

while (size > kMaxCacheSize && [queue count] > 0) {
    ApiResponseCacheItem *oldestItem = [queue objectAtIndex:0];
    size -= [oldestItem.cacheValue length];
    [dictionary removeObjectForKey:oldestItem.cacheKey];
    // remove oldest item
    [queue removeObjectAtIndex:0];
}

Please explain.

share|improve this question
1  
Does -[ApiResponseCacheItem init] return an autoreleased object? By convention it should not but maybe it's poorly written. –  user142019 Nov 12 '11 at 16:28
6  
"Please do not comment on anything except my question." - please do not instruct volunteers on how to respond. –  duffymo Nov 12 '11 at 16:30
    
@WTP, no it doesn't. In fact, I did not override init for that class. –  Ovesh Nov 12 '11 at 16:32
    
@duffymo Thank you for your helpful comment. –  Ovesh Nov 12 '11 at 16:35
    
Thank you for your useless, snarky sarcasm. –  duffymo Nov 12 '11 at 21:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So, first of all @WTP is absolutely right, and you should accept his answer. +1 to him.

The right thing to do is not touch 'item' after you have released it. And certainly don't pass it around to other unsuspecting methods after you have already released it.

But, having said that, if you want to understand why the order made a difference as to whether you survived the bug or not, the key is to remember that NSDictionary doesn't retain its keys, it copies them.

So the crashing sequence was like this:

  1. You alloc/init item - Retain count +1
  2. You add it to the array - Retain count +2
  3. You release it prematurely - Retain count +1
  4. You use it as a key in the dictionary - Retain count of your object still +1 (the dictionary made a copy of the object for its own use)
  5. You remove it from the array - Retain count 0 - object is gone
  6. You hand a dangling pointer off to -[NSMutableDictionary removeObjectForKey:] and down you go.

The lucky sequence where the bug didn't surface:

  1. You alloc/init -> +1
  2. You add it to the array -> +2
  3. You release it -> +1
  4. You use it as a key -> +1
  5. You hand it off to removeObjectForKey: -> Still +1 and you avoided the crash
  6. You remove it from the array -> Retain count goes to 0

Again, you should do what @WTP advised. This is just background info if you're curious. Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Now that was very helpful. Thanks! –  Ovesh Nov 13 '11 at 4:17

This code:

[queue addObject:item];
[item release];
[dictionary setObject:item forKey:key];

You are using item after you have released it. You should never do this. Move [item release]; after [dictionary setObject:item forKey:key];:

[queue addObject:item];
[dictionary setObject:item forKey:key];
[item release];
share|improve this answer
    
But, doesn't adding it to the queue increase the retain count by 1? –  Ovesh Nov 12 '11 at 16:38
    
I think however the code will run fine, since item will never get released (it is being retained by the array) but I think the order of operations is confusing the analyser. –  jrturton Nov 12 '11 at 16:39
2  
@Ovesh You (should pretend you) don't know what it does with it. queue may copy it, it may do its own kind of memory management, whatever. Once you release an object, never use the variable that points to it (item in this case) again, unless you assign it again to something else. –  user142019 Nov 12 '11 at 16:41
    
OK, then. First of all, what is the correct idiom for adding an object to an array, assuming I'm going to access it later? Just release it after adding it? Secondly, it doesn't answer the question that I asked. Technically, this shouldn't be happening. Because we know NSArray retains its objects. –  Ovesh Nov 12 '11 at 16:46
    
@Ovesh NSArray retains the object, yes, according to the docs. If you want to add an object to an array, use -[NSArray addObject:]. If you want to use the variable (item in this case) again, don't release it. Release it when you are done with it. –  user142019 Nov 12 '11 at 16:48

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