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Why doesn't the C# compiler tell me that this piece of code is invalid?

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        dynamic d = 1;
        MyMethod(d);
    }

    public void MyMethod(int i) 
    {
        Console.WriteLine("int");
    }
}

The call to MyMethod fails at runtime because I am trying to call a non-static method from a static method. That is very reasonable, but why doesn't the compiler consider this an error at compile time?

The following will not compile

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        dynamic d = 1;
        MyMethod(d);
    }
}

so despite the dynamic dispatch, the compiler does check that MyMethod exists. Why doesn't it verify the "staticness"?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Overload resolution is dynamic here. Visible in this code snippet:

class Program {
    public static void Main() {
        dynamic d = 1.0;
        MyMethod(d);
    }

    public void MyMethod(int i) {
        Console.WriteLine("int");
    }

    public static void MyMethod(double d) {
        Console.WriteLine("double");
    }
}

Works fine. Now assign 1 to d and note the runtime failure. The compiler cannot reasonably emulate dynamic overload resolution at compile time, so it doesn't try.

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2  
But if no instance method exist with the name "MyMethod", it should be able to generate a compile error???? Apparently the compiler is smart enough to see if no MyMethod" at all exists... so your answer has't convinced me yet... maybe you could elaborate at bit more? :-) –  Dan Byström Nov 12 '11 at 17:35
1  
I don't get why (runtime) overload resolution takes instance methods into account at all when the call site is in a static method. –  CodesInChaos Nov 12 '11 at 17:40
1  
Because it tries to generate a good diagnostic. Did the programmer forget to add the overload? Or did he forget the static keyword? –  Hans Passant Nov 12 '11 at 17:46
    
Oh. Compile time overload resolution in static methods takes instance methods into account too. Never knew that. OK that explains the runtime overloading behavior. Hmm thinking a bit more, this makes overload resolution work exactly the same way in instance methods and static methods, which is probably a good thing. –  CodesInChaos Nov 12 '11 at 17:53
1  
@Hans: I forget the static keyword on new methods all the time, so I didn't think it was a corner case :-). I do understand that it would be impossible in general for the compiler to decide what method will be called at runtime. I was looking for a reason for the compiler not preventing a runtime error when it could, an argument like "because that would require X which in turn would imply Y and Z, leading to a contradiction/ambiguity". Thank you for your help. –  Rune Nov 12 '11 at 19:05

When the compiler found the operation on/with variable of type dynamic, it will emit that information using CallSite object. (The CallSite object is store information about the call.)

In your first sample it can compile because the compiler can emit the information (e.g. type of call, method you want to call etc.). In the second code, you try to call method that doesn't exist so the compiler cannot emit IL code for you.

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Thank you for your time. I am not asking why the second example doesn't compile and I totally agree that it is possible for the compiler to emit IL for the first example. What I am asking is essentially why it allows the first example? Why doesn't it help me remember to add the static keyword to MyMethod? –  Rune Nov 12 '11 at 18:43

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