Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Reordering of array elements

In given array of elements like [a1,a2,a3,..an,b1,b2,b3,..bn,c1,c2,c3,...cn] Write a program to merge them like [a1,b1,c1,a2,b2,c2,...an,bn,cn]. We have to do it in O(1) extra space.

Sample Testcases:

Input #00:

{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12}

Output #00:

{1,5,9,2,6,10,3,7,11,4,8,12}

Explanation:

Here as you can notice, the array is of the form
{a1,a2,a3,a4,b1,b2,b3,b4,c1,c2,c3,c4} 

EDIT: I got it in Amazon placement test. Have been trying it for a long time. PLease provide psuedo code. What i tried is finding new position p for second element e(1st is already at correct position), inserting e at p and repeating the same for the old element at position p. But this is ending in a cycle. I tried detecting cycle and incrementing the starting position by 1. But even this is not working.

EDIT2:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int pos(int i, int n) 
{
    if(i<n)  
     {
         return  3*i;

           }

       else if(i>=n && i<2*n)
       {

            return 3*(i-n) + 1;
            }
    else if(i>=2*n && i<3*n)
       {
            return 3*(i-2*n) + 2;
            }
return -1;
}
void printn(int* A, int n)
{
         for(int i=0;i<3*n;i++)  
             cout << A[i]<<";";

    cout << endl;
     }

void merge(int A[], int n)
{
 int j=1;    
 int k =-1;
 int oldAj = A[1];
 int count = 0;
 int temp;
 while(count<3*n-1){

 printn(A,n);
 k = pos(j,n);
 temp = A[k];
 A[k] = oldAj;
 oldAj = temp;
 j = k;
 count++;
 if(j==1) {j++;}
}

 }

int main()
{
    int A[21] = {1,4,7,10,13,16,19,2,5,8,11,14,17,20,3,6,9,12,15,18,21};
    merge(A,7);

    cin.get();}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Michael Petrotta, Tim Post Nov 13 '11 at 14:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Show us what you have tried? –  robjb Nov 12 '11 at 17:56
1  
Why the downvote? –  Nitin Garg Nov 12 '11 at 18:04
    
See my edited answer. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 12 '11 at 19:31

5 Answers 5

This is the so called in-place in-shuffle algorithm, and it's an extremely hard task if you want to do it efficiently. I'm just posting this entry so people don't post their so called "solutions" claiming that it can be extended to work with O(1) space, without any proof...

Here is a paper for a simpler case when the list is in the form: a1 a2 a3 ... an b1 b2 b3 .. bn:

http://arxiv.org/PS_cache/arxiv/pdf/0805/0805.1598v1.pdf

share|improve this answer
    
The algorithm you refer to is linear time. Other simpler solutions are not necessary linear time. –  Vlad Nov 12 '11 at 18:30
    
Actually that paper mentions how you can solve this problem too. I believe using powers of 5 works. See this: discuss.techinterview.org/default.asp?interview.11.810768.13. Also, one can do O(nlogn) if you just use divide and conquer without applying the trick of powers of 3 (or 5 for this problem). –  user127.0.0.1 Nov 13 '11 at 0:49
3  
Actually this has been asked before on SO: stackoverflow.com/questions/5557326/… and an answer details how you can use powers of 5. Strangely enough, that answer has half the votes of the top voted answer which just complicates things. –  user127.0.0.1 Nov 13 '11 at 1:08
    
@user127.0.0.1 - can you please explain the divide and conquer approach? –  Nitin Garg Nov 13 '11 at 6:01
    
@NitinGarg: See this: discuss.techinterview.org/default.asp?interview.11.513619.27. –  user127.0.0.1 Feb 18 '12 at 19:07

This is the general solution to the problems like yours.

First of all, for each source index you know the destination index. Now, you go like that:

  1. Take the first item. Find its final place. Memorize the item at that place, and store the first item there. Now, find the place where the memorized item belongs to, and put that item there, memorizing that replaced item. Continue the process until it hits the place of the first item (obviously).
  2. If you've replaced all the items, you are finished. If not, take the first non-transferred item and continue repeat the procedure from step 1, starting with that item.

You'll need to mark which items you've transferred already. There are different ways to do it: for example, you can use one bit from the item's storage.


Okay, the solution above is not exactly O(1), as it requires N extra bits. Here is the outline of O(1) solution by place, though less efficient:

Consider the items a1, b1, c1. They need to be located at the first 3 places of the result. So we are doing the following: remembering a1, b1, c1, compacting the array except these three items to the back (so it looks like this: , , , a2, a3, ..., an, b2, b3, ..., bn, c2, c3, ..., cn), and put the items a1, b1, c1 at their places at the beginning. Now, we found the place for the first 3 items, so continue this procedure for a2, b2, c2 and so on.

Edit:
let's consider the time complexity of the outline above. Denote list size 3*n. We need n steps. Each single compactification of the list can be done in one pass, and therefore is O(n). All the other operations inside a step are O(1), so we get altogether n * O(n) = O(n^2) complexity. This is far from the best solution, however, as @yi_H mentions, linear-time solution requires heavy usage of more-or-less advanced mathematics.

share|improve this answer
    
that's not O(1). –  Karoly Horvath Nov 12 '11 at 18:03
2  
Well, let's think, maybe we can spare marking in this specific case. –  Vlad Nov 12 '11 at 18:04
2  
@SoapBox and how do you figure out if an item is in it's right position? –  Nitin Garg Nov 12 '11 at 18:15
1  
this is a very hard task, anyone claiming that his "solution" can be extended to work in O(1) without showing the actual (working!) algorithm has never really thought about it. –  Karoly Horvath Nov 12 '11 at 18:18
1  
If is easy code it, Also I'll try to code it, but I can't find O(n) time, just in-place one.Also i'm not downvoter I just see your comment and this comment is not related to your downvote. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 12 '11 at 18:46

Here's is a description of an algorithm with 3 elements of extra space and O(n^2) complexity:

sa, sb, sc are, respectively, next source index for a, b and c sequences. d is the copy destination index.

On each iterarion:

  • Copy elements at sa, sb and sc to temporary storage

  • Shift the array elements to the left to fill in the now vacant indices sa, sb and sc

  • This leaves three empty positions at d

  • Copy the three elements from temporary storage to empty positions.

Example (dots indicate "empty" positions):

First iteration:
 copy to tmp: ., 2, 3, 4,  ., 6, 7, 8,   .,10,11,12
              1            5             9
 shift:       ., ., ., 2,  3, 4, 6, 7,   8,10,11,12
 copy to dst: 1, 5, 9, 2,  3, 4, 6, 7,   8,10,11,12

Second iteration:
copy to tmp: 1, 5, 9, .,   3, 4, ., 7,   8, .,11,12
                      2          6         10
shift:       1, 5, 9, .,   ., ., 3, 4,   7, 8,11,12
copy to dst: 1, 5, 9, 2,   6,10, 3, 4,   7, 8,11,12

Third iteration:
copy to tmp: 1, 5, 9, 2,   6,10, ., 4,   ., 8, .,12
                                 3       7    11 
shift:       1, 5, 9, 2,   6,10, ., .,   ., 4, 8,12
copy to dst: 1, 5, 9, 2,   6,10, 3,  7  11, 4, 8,12

EDIT:

And here's a working program (it takes a bit more than a verbal description :)))

#include <stdio.h>

#define N 4

int a[] = {1, 2,3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12};

void
rearrange ()
{
  int i;
  int d;
  int sa, sb, sc;
  int tmp [3];

  d = 0;
  sa = 0;
  sb = sa + N;
  sc = sb + N;

  while (sc < N*3)
    {
      /* Copy out.  */
      tmp [0] = a [sa];
      tmp [1] = a [sb];
      tmp [2] = a [sc];

      /* Shift  */
      for (i = sc; i > sb + 1; --i)
        a [i] = a [i - 1];

      for (i = sb + 1; i > sa + 2; --i)
        a [i] = a [i - 2];

      sa += 3;
      sb += 2;
      sc++;

      /* Copy in.  */
      a [d++] = tmp [0];
      a [d++] = tmp [1];
      a [d++] = tmp [2];
    }
}

int
main ()
{
  int i;
  rearrange ();

  for (i = 0; i < N*3; ++i)
    printf ("%d\n", a [i]);
  putchar ('\n');
  return 0;
}

Appears to work. shrug

share|improve this answer
    
That's exact copy of my algorithm in reverse order, I don't know why you post it 4 hour later than my answer, when you simply can see my answer and provided code. I don't mean you copy past what I wrote but I think every one simply can provide this after a simple look at my answer. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 13 '11 at 12:59
1  
@SaeedAmiri, comments in your algorithm said it was not in-place, I didn't bother to read it. Besides, I provided an explanation and a working program - that alone is a reason to answer. –  chill Nov 13 '11 at 13:11
    
I'd updated my answer after comments, if you see times you can see it, and if you see my answer you can see your answer similarity to mine, also in the end of comments I'd wrote I'd edited that I'd provided in-place one, currently I'd deleted that comment but sure you see it. Also still you can see my comment on OPs question, and related time. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 13 '11 at 13:31
    
@SaeedAmiri, well, the original poster and the site visitors are free to accept your answer as better, if they think so. Case closed. –  chill Nov 13 '11 at 14:25
2  
I had written a shorter version, but there's no need for me to post it as an answer since it is the same solution that you describe... so it gets to be a comment here instead. ideone.com/kpRms –  Chris Hopman Nov 14 '11 at 6:00

I can't find any O(n) algorithm but this is O(n^2) in-place one, I'll move triples to the last each time code is tested by given input, is in C#, may be is buggy, If is so let me know:

        int[] a = new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 };
        int m = a.Length / 3;
        int firstB = a[m];

        for (int i = m-1; i > 0; i--)
        {
            int second = a[3 * m - 3];
            int third = a[3 * m - 2];
            //a[i + 2 * m] = a[i +2 * m];
            a[3 * m - 2] = a[2 * m - 1];
            a[3 * m - 3] = a[m - 1];
            for (int j = m - 1; j < 2 * m - 1; j++)
            {
                a[j] = a[j + 1];
            }
            for (int j = 2 * m - 2; j < 3 * m - 3; j++)
            {
                a[j] = a[j + 2];
            }
            a[3 * m - 5] = second;
            a[3 * m - 4] = third;
            m--;
        }
        a[1] = firstB;
share|improve this answer
    
As I understand, the OP needs in-place solution. –  Vlad Nov 12 '11 at 18:02
    
Ok I'll think about in-place version. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 12 '11 at 18:09
    
Really I don't know why simple answers like copy pasting links, or saying it's easy to do it, getting upvotes, but no one care about practical answer like this, It's really shows quality of votes in SO. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 13 '11 at 12:54
    
@yi_H: Actually it is O(1). Extra space doesn't depend on n. –  Sergey Podobry Nov 13 '11 at 13:24
    
@Sergius thanks for your attention but I'd updated my answer after their comment, in fact currently they should remove their comment, because every one see first three comment, they will think it's not in-place. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 13 '11 at 13:33

Here we have x * y numbers:

a_11, a_12, ..., a_1x,
a_21, a_22, ..., a_2x,
...
a_y1, a_y2, ..., a_yx

then the number a_ij has the index i*x + j in an array;

after your program, the new index will be

j * y + i

in your interview

{a1,a2,a3,a4,b1,b2,b3,b4,c1,c2,c3,c4} 

x is 4, and y is 3,

so with the index ``n''

i = (n - (n % 4)) / 4;
j = n % 4;

now you can calculate the new index with i, j, x, y.

Good Luck.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.