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I'm confused as to why the global alert() function is being replaced when I run this code... I'm not using prototype here.

Moo = (function(){              
    this.alert = function(s){
        console.log("Replaced Alert! " + s);
    };                  
    return this;    
})();

alert("poit");

When I run the code I do not get an alert popup, instead it runs the above code and I see the text appear in my console. Can someone explain?

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Take a look at the MDN reference for the "this" operator. It explains the several ways it can be used. –  Alexander Nov 12 '11 at 22:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

this inside the invoked anonymous function refers to window. So, you're overwriting the global alert method.

If you want to create a new object, with method alert, use:

Moo = (function(){
    var obj = {};
    obj.alert = function(s){
        console.log("Replaced Alert! " + s);
    };                  
    return obj;    
})();

An alternative method:

Moo = (function(){
    var obj = new function(){};
    obj.prototype.alert = function(){...}
    return new obj;
})();
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That certainly clears that up... –  Ian Nov 12 '11 at 22:31
1  
I was simply showing a very simple example of my code to highlight the problem. My code is quite a bit more complex. –  Ian Nov 12 '11 at 22:37
    
@jfriend00 In a closure, local variables can be defined, which do not pollute the surrounding code. Another advantage of these local scopes is that they cannot be modified from outside, unless an inner method defines it. –  Rob W Nov 12 '11 at 23:03
1  
@jfriend00 You seem to be taking his code literally... Even though the OP has already and very clearly and explicitly clearified that this is just a very simple example of his code to highlight the problem and that his real code is more complex. By your logic, then you should also be pointing out that you "see no reason" why an object needs an alert method that prepends "Replaced Alert! " to everything it outputs, assumes that "console" and its property "log" are defined, and makes use of an onomatopoeia as its variable name –  Alexander Nov 13 '11 at 11:23

As said above, the problem is that in your case, this refers to window (since you are not in a constructor).

Didn't you want to do that instead ? :

Moo = new (function(){              
    this.alert = function(s){
        console.log("Replaced Alert! " + s);
    };                  
    return this;    
})();

with the new keyword

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The this is evaluated as the global context (window).

The semantics of this in JavaScript are not always what you'd expect.

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I've noticed that. Javascripts scoping is very tricky it seems. –  Ian Nov 12 '11 at 22:37

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