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I'm not sure if permutations is the correct word for this. I want to given a set of n vectors (i.e. [1,2],[3,4] and [2,3]) permute them all and get an output of

[1,3,2],[1,3,3],[1,4,2],[1,4,3],[2,3,2] etc.

Is there an operation in R that will do this?

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I believe you are describing combinations. Permutations are similar to combinations, but the order of elements matter. –  Andrie Nov 12 '11 at 22:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a useful case for storing the vectors in a list and using do.call() to arrange for an appropriate function call for you. expand.grid() is the standard function you want. But so you don't have to type out or name individual vectors, try:

> l <- list(a = 1:2, b = 3:4, c = 2:3)
> do.call(expand.grid, l)
  a b c
1 1 3 2
2 2 3 2
3 1 4 2
4 2 4 2
5 1 3 3
6 2 3 3
7 1 4 3
8 2 4 3

However, for all my cleverness, it turns out that expand.grid() accepts a list:

> expand.grid(l)
  a b c
1 1 3 2
2 2 3 2
3 1 4 2
4 2 4 2
5 1 3 3
6 2 3 3
7 1 4 3
8 2 4 3
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+1 Blast and damnation. You stole my answer. ;-) –  Andrie Nov 15 '11 at 19:07
    
@Andrie How embarrassing! Trying to be too clever does have its advantages it would appear. I don't deserve the Accept here though. I shall make amends with some upvotes. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 15 '11 at 21:19

This is what expand.grid does.

Quoting from the help page: Create a data frame from all combinations of the supplied vectors or factors. The result is a data.frame with a row for each combination.

expand.grid(
    c(1, 2),
    c(3, 4),
    c(2, 3)
)

  Var1 Var2 Var3
1    1    3    2
2    2    3    2
3    1    4    2
4    2    4    2
5    1    3    3
6    2    3    3
7    1    4    3
8    2    4    3
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+1 Blast and damnation, you beat me to it ;-) –  Gavin Simpson Nov 12 '11 at 23:00
    
Hi, I am trying this approach, but am getting the message: "Error in rep.int(rep.int(seq_len(nx), rep.int(rep.fac, nx)), orep) : vector is too large" Are there any alternative ways to do this? –  user1375871 Dec 30 '13 at 22:23

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