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Why isn't it possible to use fluent language on string?

For example:

var x = "asdf1234";
var y = new string(x.TakeWhile(char.IsLetter).ToArray());

Isn't there a better way to convert IEnumerable<char> to string?

Here is a test I've made:

class Program
{
  static string input = "asdf1234";
  static void Main()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("1000 times:");
    RunTest(1000, input);
    Console.WriteLine("10000 times:");
    RunTest(10000,input);
    Console.WriteLine("100000 times:");
    RunTest(100000, input);
    Console.WriteLine("100000 times:");
    RunTest(100000, "ffff57467");


    Console.ReadKey();

  }

  static void RunTest( int times, string input)
  {

    Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

    sw.Start();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++)
    {
      string output = new string(input.TakeWhile(char.IsLetter).ToArray());
    }
    sw.Stop();
    var first = sw.ElapsedTicks;

    sw.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++)
    {
      string output = Regex.Match(input, @"^[A-Z]+", 
        RegexOptions.IgnoreCase).Value;
    }
    sw.Stop();
    var second = sw.ElapsedTicks;

    var regex = new Regex(@"^[A-Z]+", 
      RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    sw.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++)
    {
      var output = regex.Match(input).Value;
    }
    sw.Stop();
    var third = sw.ElapsedTicks;

    double percent = (first + second + third) / 100;
    double p1 = ( first / percent)/  100;
    double p2 = (second / percent )/100;
    double p3 = (third / percent  )/100;


    Console.WriteLine("TakeWhile took {0} ({1:P2}).,", first, p1);
    Console.WriteLine("Regex took {0}, ({1:P2})." , second,p2);
    Console.WriteLine("Preinstantiated Regex took {0}, ({1:P2}).", third,p3);
    Console.WriteLine();
  }
}

Result:

1000 times:
TakeWhile took 11217 (62.32%).,
Regex took 5044, (28.02%).
Preinstantiated Regex took 1741, (9.67%).

10000 times:
TakeWhile took 9210 (14.78%).,
Regex took 32461, (52.10%).
Preinstantiated Regex took 20669, (33.18%).

100000 times:
TakeWhile took 74945 (13.10%).,
Regex took 324520, (56.70%).
Preinstantiated Regex took 172913, (30.21%).

100000 times:
TakeWhile took 74511 (13.77%).,
Regex took 297760, (55.03%).
Preinstantiated Regex took 168911, (31.22%).

Conclusion: I'm doubting what's better to prefer, I think I'm gonna go on the TakeWhile which is the slowest only on first run.

Anyway, my question is if there is any way to optimize the performance by restringing the result of the TakeWhile function.

share|improve this question
1  
Please explain what you mean by "best": Fastest? Least memory-hungry? Easiest to understand? –  LukeH Nov 12 '11 at 23:40
    
@LukeH I've already made my decision on what to choose: fastests. My question is if there is a nicer way than new string(x.TakeWhile(p).ToArray) –  Shimmy Nov 13 '11 at 0:08
2  
@LukeH: Might want to undelete your solution: It is faster than mine by a very large margin –  BrokenGlass Nov 13 '11 at 0:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming that you're looking predominantly for performance, then something like this should be substantially faster than any of your examples:

string x = "asdf1234";
string y = x.LeadingLettersOnly();

// ...

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string LeadingLettersOnly(this string source)
    {
        if (source == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("source");

        if (source.Length == 0)
            return source;

        char[] buffer = new char[source.Length];
        int bufferIndex = 0;

        for (int sourceIndex = 0; sourceIndex < source.Length; sourceIndex++)
        {
            char c = source[sourceIndex];

            if (!char.IsLetter(c))
                break;

            buffer[bufferIndex++] = c;
        }
        return new string(buffer, 0, bufferIndex);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, just noticed that you only need letters from the beginning of the string, in which case I'd expect BrokenGlass's answer to be the fastest. (Again, I haven't actually benchmarked to confirm.) –  LukeH Nov 13 '11 at 0:20
1  
+1 Pre-allocating the buffer is probably what makes this faster, but this is just a guess - limited testing shows its way faster than using Substring() –  BrokenGlass Nov 13 '11 at 0:35

You can very often do better performance-wise. But what does that buy you? Unless this is really the bottle neck for your application and you have measured it to be I would stick to the Linq TakeWhile() version: It is the most readable and maintainable solution, and that is what counts for most of all applications.

If you really are looking for raw performance you could do the conversion manually - the following was around a factor 4+ (depending on input string length) faster than TakeWhile() in my tests - but I wouldn't use it personally unless it was critical:

int j = 0;
for (; j < input.Length; j++)
{
    if (!char.IsLetter(input[j]))
        break;
}
string output = input.Substring(0, j);
share|improve this answer
    
+1. And there's nothing wrong with wrapping this up in a helper method of some kind for re-use. Something like source.LeadingLettersOnly() would be more readable than new string(source.TakeWhile(char.IsLetter).ToArray()), imo. –  LukeH Nov 13 '11 at 0:29
    
@LukeH: Your solution is way faster - please undelete! –  BrokenGlass Nov 13 '11 at 0:30
    
The function is supposed to compare a search query to a few thousands (100000) string's first chars, so performance is all that matters. –  Shimmy Nov 13 '11 at 0:33
    
@BrokenGlass: Ok, I've undeleted. I still haven't run any benchmarks but I'm surprised than mine outruns yours. I guess yours needs two loops, the explicit one first then another inside Substring somewhere (although I'd assume that Substring would use some native code to blit the required data as fast as possible.) –  LukeH Nov 13 '11 at 0:38
    
@LukeH: That line is more readable, but the supporting code is not more readable. I'd have to write many unit tests for the extension method, while the Linq I would probably just code review. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 13 '11 at 2:37

How about this to convert IEnumerable<char> to string:

string.Concat(x.TakeWhile(char.IsLetter));
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Very short and doesn't require .ToArray() –  Alex Oct 9 '12 at 8:57
    
I guess that string.Concat uses a StringBuilder internally. Would be very strange if it didn't. So this solution should also perform really well. –  noah1989 Apr 16 '13 at 10:17
    
.Net 4.0 only. Even if you write your own .TakeWhile in 3.5 then string.Concat(IEnumerable<char>) doesn't do what you expect. –  Dylan Nicholson Dec 6 '13 at 4:04

Why isn't it possible to use fluent language on string?

It is possible. You did it in the question itself:

var y = new string(x.TakeWhile(char.IsLetter).ToArray());

Isn't there a better way to convert IEnumerable<char> to string?

(My assumption is:)

The framework does not have such a constructor because strings are immutable, and you'd have to traverse the enumeration twice in order to pre-allocate the memory for the string. This is not always an option, especially if your input is a stream.

The only solution to this is to push to a backing array or StringBuilder first, and reallocate as the input grows. For something as low-level as a string, this probably should be considered too-hidden a mechanism. It also would push perf problems down into the string class by encouraging people to use a mechanism that cannot be as-fast-as-possible.

These problems are solved easily by requiring the user to use the ToArray extension method.

As others have pointed out, you can achieve what you want (perf and expressive code) if you write support code, and wrap that support code in an extension method to get a clean interface.

share|improve this answer
    
BTW, Best thing to do it "fluent", is I added to my extensions library a Join overload that takes an IEnumerable<char> and returns string. –  Shimmy Nov 13 '11 at 2:57
2  
Anonymous downvoters don't help anything. State your reasons and I will address your concerns. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 16 '11 at 1:46

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