Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

0K, here it the problem, I'll try to make it as clear as possible.

So, we have an array of key-value pairs in the form unique id => number.

pseudo code array A= array(0 => 17, 1 => 26, 2 => 17, 3 => 2, 4 => 7, 5 => 8);

we see that the total of the numbers is 60. THIS IS ALWAYS CORRECT, SO THE TOTAL IN ARRAY A IS ALWAYS CORRECT.

now we have array B in array B, also unique id => value pairs, BUT here some of the values are PHONY/INCORRECT, and total(array B)-total(array A) has to be 0.

i.e. for the upper example array A= array(6 => 22, 7 => 11, 8 => 8, 9 => 9, 10 => 5, 11 => 10, 12 => 7, 13 => 17, 14 => 10);

now, array B total is 99. 60-99=-39, which means we have to find all of the combinations of numbers that equal 39 from array B. in this case, just looking @ eye it seems the only 2 combinations of this are possible: that unique ids 10, 12 ,13, 14 are incorrect or that 10, 11, 12, 13 are PHONY/INCORRECT (5+7+17+10=39). now, with such small arrays it is easy to find these using loops and iterating through all possible options, but with arrays ranging in the thousands (of unique IDs). what is the best way to do this? how would the computer find the phony/incorrect pairs the fastest?

Also, I owe a beer to the person that gives the best (and good) answer.

share|improve this question
3  
Hmm, person behind anonymous account offers me free beer. Tempting, but... nah. – Fred Foo Nov 12 '11 at 23:31
    
the larger the array, the larger the number of "valid" combinations will grow. On thing is sure, before checking I would sort "b" by value, and exclude all values bigger than the difference. – roselan Nov 12 '11 at 23:40
1  
This is the subset sum problem – Eric Nov 12 '11 at 23:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

now, array B total is 99. 60-99=-39, which means we have to find all of the combinations of numbers that equal 39 from array B.

This is only true if you know that all numbers that are wrong should have been zeros.

Any or all numbers in the array could contribute to the error by being off by such amounts that the total of the error amounts is 39.

That being said, the problem of finding a subset of a list of numbers that add to a particular sum is related to the Subset Sum problem, though the normal statement of the problem is only verifying the existence of such a subset, and you're looking for a list of all such subsets.

I don't believe an effective solution exists for large sets, and the brute force solution grows exponentially.

share|improve this answer
1  
Typically, the number of such subsets grows exponentially, so there goes efficiency. – Daniel Fischer Nov 13 '11 at 0:43
    
This is only true if you know that all numbers that are wrong should have been zeros. <- this is, in fact the case. the numbers aren't partially right in this case, they're either completely wrong or right. got any ideas how to do this (of course, brute force isn't an option)? – user1043658 Nov 13 '11 at 11:03
1  
The exponential time complexity actually may not be that hard in this case. The pseudo-polynomial solution is O(KN), where K is the difference (e.g. 39). So, if you know that the difference will be reasonably small, this solution may be quite fast. And you won't find any solution that is faster. – svick Nov 13 '11 at 12:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.