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I have a javascript variable which is referencing a complex object (it is a slideshow control but that's not important)

e.g.
var slideshow = new SlideShow();

Because i have multiple slideshows on the page and I want to make accessing certain operations generic/reuse code in different pages.

I WANT TO BE ABLE TO ACCESS DIFFERENT VARIABLES CONTAINING DIFFERENT INSTANCES OF THE SLIDESHOWS IN THE SAME JAVASCRIPT ROUTINE. THE VARIABLE USED IS DIFFERENT DEPENDING ON WHAT SLIDESHOW IS BEING CONTROLLED AT THE TIME.

So instead of

slideshow.playSlides();

do something like

[dynamically get reference to variable containing slideshow].playSlides();

I've looked into this before in JavaScript and not found a solution, I'm wondering if this can be done in JQUERY somehow?

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how are you instantiating multiple slideshows ? –  Vikram May 1 '09 at 10:06
    
"without having a reference to its variable name in the code" is really confusing statement because when taken literally, you're saying the variable cannot exist at all. –  Chad Grant May 1 '09 at 10:13
    
Not really clear... can't you just pass your slideshow into a function? –  CurtainDog May 1 '09 at 10:27
    
"without having a reference to its variable name in the code" - yup badly worded, apologies –  AJM May 1 '09 at 11:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well... something has to contain the variable, so that's the question you need to answer first. My thought would be to store it in a hash, which, may not look much different to you at first:

var slideshows = {};    
slideshows['someslideshowName'] = new SlideShow();

But now you can reference by name with no issues.

or it could look like....

window.slideshows = {};
var slideShowName = 'someSlideShowName';
window.slideshows[slideShowName] = new SlideShow();
share|improve this answer
    
I think my brain broke on the question. We all had different interpretations lol –  Chad Grant May 1 '09 at 10:15
    
The var statement must be followed by a legal identifier. Initialising a property on an object does not require 'var' –  James May 1 '09 at 11:15
    
Point made. Fixed it up. –  altCognito May 1 '09 at 11:26
    
using a hash did the trick for me. Thanks –  AJM May 1 '09 at 11:29

If it's a global variable, you can use the window object:

var name = 'slideshow';
window[name].playSlides();

Usually this kind of thing isn't necessary though - you should probably be passing around your slideshow variable. What are you trying to achieve?

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Note, the danger in using straight window is that you're going to overwrite some property of window that you don't mean to. make it a subproperty (which is what my answer essentially does. –  altCognito May 1 '09 at 10:04
    
(not a subproperty but just a specific known-to-be-empty-property of window) –  altCognito May 1 '09 at 10:06

If I understand the question, why not create an array of slideshows and enum them so you have 0 to N slide shows and not need to recode.

var slideshows = [new SlideShow()];

function playSlides() {
   for(var i=0; i < slideshows.length; i++) {
       slideshows[i].playSlides();
   }
}
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+1, We did all come up with something different, I kind of like not naming the instances. Somebody should get something out of it. :) –  altCognito May 1 '09 at 11:27

I'm going to add a completely different solution that I think makes a whole lot more sense:

As I said, something has to contain the variable

If it's a control which which is rendered by the browser. I would hang the instance off of the element which represents the control. Ideally, you're assigning some sort of class to the element. So, it's pretty straightforward after that.

$('.theslideshowclass').each(function() {
   this.slideshow = new SlideShow();
});

That's a jQuery style solution. I'm disappointed I didn't do it that way the first time.

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