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I'm testing out user defined literals. I want to make _fac return the factorial of the number.

Having it call a constexpr function works, however it doesn't let me do it with templates as the compiler complains that the arguments are not and cannot be constexpr.

I'm confused by this - aren't literals constant expressions? The 5 in 5_fac is always a literal that can be evaluated during compile time, so why can't I use it as such?

First method:

constexpr int factorial_function(int x) {
  return (x > 0) ? x * factorial_function(x - 1) : 1;
}

constexpr int operator "" _fac(unsigned long long x) {
  return factorial_function(x); // this works
}

Second method:

template <int N> struct factorial {
  static const unsigned int value = N * factorial<N - 1>::value;
};
template <> struct factorial<0> {
  static const unsigned int value = 1;
};

constexpr int operator "" _fac(unsigned long long x) {
  return factorial_template<x>::value; // doesn't work - x is not a constexpr
}
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I don't think any compiler implements those user-defined literals yet. How are you testing this? –  Kerrek SB Nov 12 '11 at 23:58
    
@KerrekSB GCC 4.7 snapshot –  Pubby Nov 13 '11 at 0:01
    
Nice! I didn't know that was supported yet. I have one of those installed on a machine somewhere, now I'm tempted to work out those variadic templates :-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '11 at 0:07

5 Answers 5

I can't get it to work with my 4.7.0 snapshot, but here's what I think the identity int literal should look like:

template <unsigned int base, unsigned int exponent> struct Pow
{
  static const unsigned int value = base * Pow<base, exponent - 1>::value;
};
template <unsigned int base> struct Pow<base, 0>
{
  static const unsigned int value = 1;
};
template <char ...Chars>
constexpr unsigned int operator "" _fac()
{
  return facimpl<sizeof...(Chars), Chars...>::value;
}

template <unsigned int D, char...> struct facimpl;
template <unsigned int D> struct facimpl<D>
{
  static_assert(D == 0, "Bad invocation of facimpl<D, Chars...>.");
};
template <> struct facimpl<0>
{
  static const unsigned int value = 0;
};
template <unsigned int D, char C, char ...Rest> struct facimpl<D, C, Rest...>
{
  static const unsigned int value = Pow<10, D - 1>::value * (C - '0') + facimpl<D - 1, Rest...>::value;
};

int main()
{
  return 123_fac;
}

You can of course replace facimpl<Chars...>::value by any compile-time factorial expression you like.

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1  
Wouldn't that be backwards? That is, it would give value as 321, not 123, or have I got this confused? You need to pass an accumulator parameter to facimpl to get it to come out correctly. –  Nate Nov 13 '11 at 0:21
    
123 -> 1 + 20 + 300 = 321. I can confirm it's backwards. –  Pubby Nov 13 '11 at 0:26
    
D'oh, sorry, I got it wrong. Yes, we need an accumulator. Let me edit it. –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '11 at 0:28
    
Happens to the best of us on a good day. That's what we get for not having a compiler handy to actually test it :^p –  Nate Nov 13 '11 at 0:29
    
I'm downloading a new snapshot as we speak :-) OK, try it now. I hope std::pow is const-expr; otherwise you'll have to write your own template-pow! Or a variadic reverser. Whichever floats your boat. –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '11 at 0:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is how I ended up doing it:

template <typename t>
constexpr t pow(t base, int exp) {
  return (exp > 0) ? base * pow(base, exp-1) : 1;
};

template <char...> struct literal;
template <> struct literal<> {
  static const unsigned int to_int = 0;
};
template <char c, char ...cv> struct literal<c, cv...> {
  static const unsigned int to_int = (c - '0') * pow(10, sizeof...(cv)) + literal<cv...>::to_int;
};

template <int N> struct factorial {
  static const unsigned int value = N * factorial<N - 1>::value;
};
template <> struct factorial<0> {
  static const unsigned int value = 1;
};

template <char ...cv>
constexpr unsigned int operator "" _fac()
{
  return factorial<literal<cv...>::to_int>::value;
}

Huge thanks to KerrekSB!

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Why the enum hack in the factorial? You can just say static const unsigned int value = 1; etc... –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '11 at 0:55

In order to make use of constexpr with user defined literals, you apparently have to use a variadic template. Take a look at the second listing in the wikipedia article for an example.

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You don't always have to use variadic templates to use constexpr, but this case does require it (but I know what you mean). –  Seth Carnegie Nov 13 '11 at 0:00
    
How can I turn a variadic template of char into int? –  Pubby Nov 13 '11 at 0:02
    
@SethCarnegie: corrected –  Nate Nov 13 '11 at 0:05
    
@Pubby - subtract 0x30 from it? I'm not sure of a better way, but you might be able to use partial template specialization for it... though the thought hurts my head. –  Nate Nov 13 '11 at 0:08

I may be wrong, but I think constexpr functions can also be called with non-constant arguments (in which case they don't give a constant expression and are evaluated at runtime). Which wouldn't work well with non-type template arguments.

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Well, presumably, the compiler would complain if you passed a non-compile-time-constant to the function then. Could this be a way to solve the problem where template-ness trickles all the way up layers of code? –  Michael Price Nov 13 '11 at 4:54
    
@MichaelPrice: Of course it could complain about passing non-const expressions to constexpr functions (and as I said, I'm not sure that I'm right). But that would mean that you'd generally need two functions which are exactly the same except for the constexpr keyword, one for constant expressions and one for all other expressions. –  celtschk Nov 13 '11 at 10:42

@Pubby. The easy way to digest the char non-type parameter pack is to cature it into an initializer list for a string. Then you can use atoi, atof, etc:

#include <iostream>

template<char... Chars>
  int
  operator "" _suffix()
  {
    const char str[]{Chars..., '\0'};
    return atoi(str);
  }

int
main()
{
  std::cout << 12345_suffix << std::endl;
}

Remember to tack on a null character for the C-style functions.

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The problem with that is it isn't constexpr. It's actually worse than passing unsigned long long as the argument type. –  Pubby Nov 13 '11 at 5:59

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