Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to find out maximum value in a hash and corresponding key to that maximum value. My hash looks like

%hash = (
    bob => "4.9",
    gita => "3.9 , 6.8",
    diu => "3.0",
);

Now I want to find the maximum value in that hash with the key it belongs.

Output needed is

gita 6.8  

I am trying to sort the values in %hash in ascending order to get the maximum value like this

sub hashValueAscendingNum {
    $hash{$a} cmp $hash{$b};
}

foreach my $highest (sort hashValueAscendingNum(keys(%hash))) {
    print "\t $hash{$highestMagnitude} \t\t $highest \n";
}

I want all the values in the hash to be checked, and the one with maximum value should be returned with its key.

How can i do that?

share|improve this question
2  
You should at least pretend to put some effort into posing your question. That is not a %hash where there are multiple values associated with a key. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 13 '11 at 0:32
2  
@SinanÜnür I wouldn't be too hard on Sonam. They might not know Perl well enough to understand that it's not really a hash. –  David W. Nov 13 '11 at 4:12

4 Answers 4

You need to first associate each key with the highest of the values corresponding to it in the original %hash and then find the key associated with the highest value.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

use List::Util qw( max );

my  %hash = (
    bob => [ 4.9 ],
    gita => [ 3.9, 6.8 ],
    diu => [ 3.0 ],
);

my %max = map { $_ => max @{ $hash{$_} } } keys %hash;

my ($argmax) = (sort { $max{$b} <=> $max{$a} } keys %max)[0];
my $max = $max{ $argmax };

print join(' => ', $argmax, $max), "\n";

Of course, this is very inefficient (esp. using sort) but for the dimensions you showed, it does not matter. For completeness, here is a more efficient version using each:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

use List::Util qw( max );

my  %hash = (
    bob => [ 4.9 ],
    gita => [ 3.9, 6.8 ],
    diu => [ 3.0 ],
);

my ($argmax, $max) = @{ init_argmax_max(\%hash) };

while (my ($k, $v) = each %hash) {
    $v = max @{ $v };
    if ( $v > $max ) {
        $argmax = $k;
        $max = $v;
    }
}

print join(' => ', $argmax, $max), "\n";

sub init_argmax_max {
    my ($hash) = @_;
    my ($argmax, $max) = each %{ $hash };

    keys %{ $hash };

    $max = max @{ $max };

    return [$argmax, $max];
}
share|improve this answer

A hash has only a single key and a single value, and each key must be unique. In your original problem you have this:

%hash = (
   bob => "4.9",
   gita =>"3.9 , 6,8",
   diu => "3.0",
);

Well, gita can't have two values. Nor, can you have two keys in your hash equal to gita. Thus, you can't use a simple hash to store your values.

There are ways around this though by using references. For example, each element in your hash can contain a reference to an array. Thus, your data structure can look like this:

%hash = (
    bob =>  [(4.9)],
    gita => [(3.9, 6.8)],
    diu  => [(3.0)],
);

The [ and ] marks a reference to an array.

However, this wouldn't really solve your particular problem since you now have to go through each key in the hash, then each element in the array for each key, and sort those. You could create a sorting subroutine, but just because you can say sort doesn't make it efficient.

Maybe what you need is an array of arrays. This will get rid of the issue you have with gita having two values, but make sorting a bit easier. Imagine a structure like this:

my @array = (
    [bob  => 4.9],
    [gita => 3.9],
    [gita => 6.8],
    [diu  => 3.0],
);

Now, we can do a sort on @array depending upon the value of $array[$x]->[1]! All we need is for each element of the array @array is to compare $a->[1] with $b->[1]. Then, if we do a reverse sort on it, the biggest element will be $array[0]. The name is $array[0]->[0] and the element is $array->[0]->[1].

#! /usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say switch);

my @array = (
    [bob  => 4.9],
    [gita => 3.9],
    [gita => 6.8],
    [diu  => 3.0],
);

@array = reverse sort mysort @array;

say "$array[0]->[0] $array[0]->[1]";

sub mysort {
    $a->[1] <=> $b->[1];
}

And the output is:

gita 6.8.

You notice that link to Perldoc's perllol? I suggest you read it if you've never worked with Perl references before.

share|improve this answer
#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my %hash = (
    bob  => [ 4.9 ],
    gita => [ 3.9, 6.8 ],
    diu  => [ 3.0 ],
);

my $max_key;
my $max_val=0;

foreach my $key (keys %hash) {
    foreach my $val ( @{$hash{$key}} ) {
        ($max_key, $max_val) = ($key, $val)
            if $val > $max_val;
    }
}

print "$max_key => $max_val\n";
share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much it was really helpful. –  ssharma Nov 13 '11 at 3:37

You got several good answers. Now a bad one (assuming you fix the decimal separator in the hash):

my %hash = (bob => "4.9",
            gita =>"3.9 , 6.8",
            diu => "3.0",
            );

my $max = (map{join" ",@$_[0,1]}sort{$b->[1]-$a->[1]}map{[$_,sort{$b-$a}split(/ , /,$hash{$_})]}keys%hash)[0];

print "$max\n";

Output:

gita 6.8

Never do this unless you're deliberately trying to golf and/or obfuscate it though.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.