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I want to know, is this legal?

function test()
{
    alert ("hello")
    $("#loading").show();
}

Or should I write this instead:

function test()
{
    alert ("hello");
    $("#loading").show();
}

Are semicolons optional in JavaScript? Because I saw this in a forum:

No, semicolons are usually optional in JavaScript (google for ASI / automatic semicolon insertion). Using them makes the code look much cleaner though and ASI is a horrible mis-feature (at least in my opinion).

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1  
See: stackoverflow.com/questions/7219541/… and other answers to the question –  NullUserException Nov 13 '11 at 1:31
1  
Your two statements both have semicolons - neither are different. –  Nightfirecat Nov 13 '11 at 1:38
    
@Nightfirecat - They didn't originally, looks like NullUserException's edit put the semi-colon back in. Edit: but then removed it again! –  James Allardice Nov 13 '11 at 1:40
1  
@Nightfirecat . sorry i updated it –  Kanishka Panamaldeniya Nov 13 '11 at 1:40
    
Sorry about that... –  NullUserException Nov 13 '11 at 1:41
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Semicolons are not always mandatory, but I would always recommend using them. See the ECMAScript spec for the rules on automatic semicolon insertion:

Certain ECMAScript statements (empty statement, variable statement, expression statement, do-while statement, continue statement, break statement, return statement, and throw statement) must be terminated with semicolons. Such semicolons may always appear explicitly in the source text. For convenience, however, such semicolons may be omitted from the source text in certain situations. These situations are described by saying that semicolons are automatically inserted into the source code token stream in those situations.

Update (to explain further)

Perhaps the most common situation used to show why automatic semicolon insertion can be bad is that touched on by @sissonb in another answer. Consider the following:

function something(a, b) {
    return
    a + b;
}

What you may be expecting is for the new-line to be ignored, and the code interpreted as:

function something(a, b) {
    return a + b;
}

Unfortunately, automatic semicolon insertion comes into play, and the code is actually interpreted like this:

function something(a, b) {
    return;
    a + b;
}

And an empty return statement means the function returns undefined. So instead of a nice sum of the two argument, you get undefined and potentially end up very confused as to where you've gone wrong! Which is why I completely agree with the statement in your question that automatic semicolon insertion is a horrible misfeature.

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One sensible exception would be a one-liner callback: ar.sort(function(a, b) { return f(a) - f(b) }) –  mu is too short Nov 13 '11 at 1:53
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Semicolons are not mandatory. They are automatically added at the end of a line if it is missing which actually causes this code to return undefined.

return
{
   text:"hello"
}
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It actually returns undefined, which is not quite the same thing as null –  NullUserException Nov 13 '11 at 1:43
    
@NullUserExceptionఠ_ఠ Updated my answer. Thanks –  sissonb Nov 13 '11 at 1:44
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