Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Every time a user registers to our site we need to show a NDA (non-disclosure agreement). In order to continue the user has to accept it. My issue is that I have the NDA in all one page and the user does not really read it and accept (like we all do).

What I want is to make sure the user reads the NDA and accepts it one he "read" it?

What I have now is a simple jQuery validation if the user checks a box and click on accept. then it goes to the next page.

Here's what i have

<script>
$(document).ready(function() {
 $('#go').click(function() {
  // check if checkbox is check and go to next page
  // i have this code
 });
});
</script>
<div>
full nda
<hr>
<input type=checkbox> <input type=button value=go id=go>
</div>

I already have the code for the checkbox and button

i simply dont want the user to blindly accept the nda

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
Nodoby actually reads that stuff, regardless of what countermeasures you put in place. –  NullUserException Nov 13 '11 at 1:51
1  
Well, I DON'T READ ANY OF THEM ... however, I DO HAVE TO CLICK A CHECK BOX and click on a button. That's the original question ... I believe. –  zequinha-bsb Nov 13 '11 at 1:56
    
In my membership sites, for instance, I require an e-mail verification. The user can opt to verify the e-mail right there at registration or later. When (s)he logs in the next visit, I check for the e-mail verification in the user database and, if (s)he has not verified it yet, I send him/her to the e-mail verification page. After 5 attempts, account revoked! –  zequinha-bsb Nov 13 '11 at 1:58
3  
I would suggest this question may be better served at the User Experience stackexchange because UX [should] influence this design decision more than the javascript side of things. –  wildpeaks Nov 13 '11 at 1:59
    
I agree... The original question sounded like a javascript problem, now I'm not sure of what is being asked (if it's about the mechanics or HCI). Xin, are you asking about javascript code to have an Opt In checkbox or do you want to know "how" this should be done to capture the user focus? –  Anthony Accioly Nov 13 '11 at 2:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you want to prevent the user to find the "I agree checkbox" and submit button right way you will have to hide it and then show these inputs once he read the last page.

Here's a sample script you can use. This loads the terms as you scroll the page and at the last one it adds a check-box and submit button.

Make sure the page is long enough so you have to scroll and also use the .live event (because the checkbox and input button don't exists when you load the page)

// main page
<script>
function getTC() {
    var id = $(".paragraph:last").attr("id").replace('tnc', '');
    if((parseInt(id) + 1) > 10) {
        return;
    }
    $.post("terms.php?paragraph=" + id, function(r) {
        $('#terms').append(r);
    });
}

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(window).scroll(function(){
        if($(window).scrollTop() == $(document).height() - $(window).height()) {
            getTC();
        }
    });

    // logic for checkbox & submit using .live

});
</script>

<div id="terms">
 <div class="paragraph" id="tnc1">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet ...
 </div>
 <div class="paragraph" id="tnc2">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet ...
 </div>
 <div class="paragraph" id="tnc3">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet ...
 </div>
 <div class="paragraph" id="tnc4">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet ...
 </div>
</div>

// php
<?php

// add security here

if(!isset($_GET['paragraph'])) {
    $_GET['paragraph'] = '1';
}
$_GET['paragraph'] = (int)$_GET['paragraph'] + 1;

if($_GET['paragraph'] <= 10) {
?>
<div class="paragraph" id="tnc<?php echo $_GET['paragraph'] ;?>">
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet ...
</div>
<?php
    if($_GET['paragraph'] == 10) {
        echo '<hr/>I agree with the terms and conditions <input type="checkbox" /><input type="button" value="I accept" /><hr/>';
    }
}
share|improve this answer

It depends how you want to do it. Here are 3 common ways people do it.

  1. I accept this disclosure agreement | Checkbox
  2. Once they scroll to the bottom of it, enable the 'Next' button
  3. Set a timer, once the time has elapsed, eneable the 'Next' button.
share|improve this answer

Here's the basic structure for what you want:

if($('#mycheckboxid').attr('checked')) {
    window.location='http://stackoverflow.com';
} else {
    alert("You must Opt in");
}

Working fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/XPEE7/2/

share|improve this answer

This is more a user experience design issue.

There is no easy way to force a user to read the entire agreement. The best you may do is forcing the user to scroll to the bottom of the agreement assuming that the user is going to read in full.

$('#agreement').scroll(function(event) {
    var scroller = $(this)
        , cnt = $('.content', this);

    if (scroller.scrollTop() + scroller.height() >= cnt.height()) {
        $('#confirm').removeAttr('disabled');
    }
    else {
        $('#confirm').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
    }
});

This concept would need to implement a scroller and use a handler to listen to the scroll event of the scroller. In the case of reaching the bottom of the agreement, enable the confirm button.

This is a rough example. Please test it in Firefox / Safari. I doubt it works below IE9.

Please look at the fiddle for the example.

http://jsfiddle.net/gzfelix/7GArc/

share|improve this answer

My issue is that I have the NDA in all one page and the user does not really read it and accept (like we all do).

What I want is to make sure the user reads the NDA

The only way to confirm that they've actually read it is to give them a comprehension test before they can continue, i.e., force them to answer some questions about what they read. I've never seen this done with a sign-up agreement (only with training material), but you could do it. I would not recommend you actually do this, but...it sounds like this is that what you're asking and it is easy to implement. (Just very annoying to users.)

Otherwise, of course there are several common techniques that a lot of sites use to "encourage" the user to read the agreement, like not letting the user continue unless they scroll to the bottom of the text (and if you only have a short agreement then put it in an even shorter scrolling div), or have the text accessed via a hyperlink and not let the user continue if they haven't clicked the hyperlink and then ticked the box. Or a timer. But I think most users get used to skipping these things without reading them.

In your case you said the agreement is only one page, so that is much more likely to be read than a long agreement.

I think the best solution is "Don't worry". They've clicked the box, so if they break the agreement you can sue them. Put the agreement in plain text, then have a one-liner in bold next to the checkbox about them being legally bound by the agreement.

share|improve this answer

FootieLegend has given you, basically, all the scenarios. Now, the question is: do you have a field in the USERS database where you have a "NDAread"? With that, you can check it next time the user returns to the site and, if it is not checked ("Y" - char field), you send the user to the NDA again ... until, you can either ban the user (somehow) or he gets to accept the agreement.

share|improve this answer
    
yes i have a field in the database so next time the user login it does not show –  Xin Qian Ch'ang Nov 13 '11 at 1:54

To me, the important thing is to get them to sign it. That is, to confirm that they agreed to the terms, not that they necessarily read them all. If they sign something without reading it, that's their problem.

Then (at least in theory) you can hold them to any consequences regarding violating it, since you have 'proof' they agreed to the terms. (Legally speaking, a value in your database is not real proof, so if you really need that you probably have to have them sign something physically and return it to you.)

As others have already mentioned, there's really no reasonable, foolproof way ensure they read it all.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.