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I've looked at various Q&As on SO similar to this question but haven't found a solution.

What I have is an enum which represents different ways to view a TV Guide...

In the NDroid Application class

static enum guideView {
    GUIDE_VIEW_SEVEN_DAY,
    GUIDE_VIEW_NOW_SHOWING,
    GUIDE_VIEW_ALL_TIMESLOTS
}

...when the user changes the view an event handler receives an int from 0-2 and I'd like to do something like this...

In an Android Activity onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) event handler

// 'which' is an int from 0-2
switch (which) {
    case NDroid.guideView.GUIDE_VIEW_SEVEN_DAY:
    ...
    break;
}

I'm used to C# enums and select/case statements which would allow something like the above and I know Java does things differently but I just can't make sense of what I need to do.

Am I going to have to resort to if statements? There will likely only ever be 3 choices so I could do it but I wondered how it could be done with switch-case in Java.

EDIT Sorry I didn't completely expand on the issue as I was looking at it as being a generic Java issue. I've added to the question to explain a bit further.

There isn't anything that's Android specific which is why I didn't tag it as Android but the enum is defined in the Application class and the code where I wan't the switch is in an Activity. The enum is static as I need to access it from multiple Activities.

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Should just be case GUIDE_VIEW_SEVEN_DAY after proper imports; what problem(s) are you having? –  Dave Newton Nov 13 '11 at 1:52
    
Can't you just make your event handler receive an enum? Aside from that, perhaps this will help: stackoverflow.com/questions/5292790/… –  Brian Roach Nov 13 '11 at 1:55
    
@Dave: Ooops sorry, I've corrected the code to show how it is. Eclipse is giving me a Type Mismatch error saying it can't convert from guideView to int. –  Squonk Nov 13 '11 at 1:59
    
@Brian: This is an Android app and the event handler (OnClickListener ) is defined by the DialogInterface interface that I have to implement. –  Squonk Nov 13 '11 at 2:01
    
@MisterSquonk Oh, I missed you were getting it from an int--sorry, see Ophidian's answer, although I'd put the functionality in the enum. –  Dave Newton Nov 13 '11 at 2:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 27 down vote accepted

The part you're missing is converting from the integer to the type-safe enum. Java will not do it automatically. There's a couple of ways you can go about this:

  1. Use a list of static final ints rather than a type-safe enum and switch on the int value you receive (this is the pre-Java 5 approach)
  2. Switch on either a specified id value (as described by heneryville) or the ordinal value of the enum values; i.e. guideView.GUIDE_VIEW_SEVEN_DAY.ordinal()
  3. Determine the enum value represented by the int value and then switch on the enum value.

    enum GuideView {
        SEVEN_DAY,
        NOW_SHOWING,
        ALL_TIMESLOTS
    }
    
    // Working on the assumption that your int value is 
    // the ordinal value of the items in your enum
    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
        GuideView whichView = GuideView.values()[which] //do your own bounds checking
        switch (whichView) {
            case SEVEN_DAY:
                ...
                break;
            case NOW_SHOWING:
                ...
                break;
        }
    }
    

    You may find it more helpful / less error prone to write a custom valueOf implementation that takes your integer values as an argument to resolve the appropriate enum value and lets you centralize your bounds checking.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks. It took me a while to work it into my code but it's working nicely now with the example code you posted. 6 years with C# and 1 year with Java - it's not often I come across something that stumps me. So many similarities but the occasional one like this which is so very different. I won't forget this one in a hurry. :-) –  Squonk Nov 13 '11 at 3:06
1  
You need the unqualified enum names in the case statement, so case GuideView.SEVEN_DAY: gives a compilation error, it should be case SEVEN_DAY:. –  haridsv Jul 8 at 11:58

If whichView is an object of the GuideView Enum, following works well. Please note that there is no qualifier for the constant after case.

switch (whichView) {
    case SEVEN_DAY:
        ...
        break;
    case NOW_SHOWING:
        ...
        break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
how is this even possible?! –  Jes Chergui Mar 18 at 16:12

Java enums are rather different from C# enums. In C# it's really an extension of a group of constants, where in Java, it's more like a finite listing of objects from a single class. You can leverage this to create an enum that will work here.

public enum GuideView {
  GUIDE_VIEW_SEVEN_DAY(0),
  GUIDE_VIEW_NOW_SHOWING(1),
  GUIDE_VIEW_ALL_TIMESLOTS(2);

  private int eventID;

  GuideView(int eventID) {
    this.eventID = eventID;
  }

  public int getEventID() { return eventID;}
}

Then the switch statement would use this value:

switch (which) {
  case NDroid.guideView.GUIDE_VIEW_SEVEN_DAY.getEventID():
  ...
  break;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Thanks. I've implemented it the way you describe as the getEventID() method will be useful. Unfortunately Eclipse tells me that case needs a constant - perhaps this is to do with this being Java for Android. The answer was useful anyway so I upvoted. –  Squonk Nov 13 '11 at 2:59

The enums should not be qualified within the case label like what you have NDroid.guideView.GUIDE_VIEW_SEVEN_DAY, instead you should remove the qualification and use GUIDE_VIEW_SEVEN_DAY

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This should work in the way that you describe. What error are you getting? If you could pastebin your code that would help.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/enum.html

EDIT: Are you sure you want to define a static enum? That doesn't sound right to me. An enum is much like any other object. If your code compiles and runs but gives incorrect results, this would probably be why.

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"Nested enum types are implicitly static. It is permissable to explicitly declare a nested enum type to be static."—JLS §8.9. –  trashgod Nov 13 '11 at 1:58
    
@trashgod, indeed- but I would always use the implicit declaration to avoid confusion as that's actually more obvious IMO. A global static enum (which is what I assume this is) is probably wrong in most cases. –  SystemParadox Nov 13 '11 at 2:06
enumerations accessing is very simple in switch case

private TYPE currentView;

//declaration of enum 
public enum TYPE {
        FIRST, SECOND, THIRD
    };

//handling in switch case
switch (getCurrentView())
        {
        case FIRST:
            break;
        case SECOND:
            break;
        case THIRD:
            break;
        }

//getter and setter of the enum
public void setCurrentView(TYPE currentView) {
        this.currentView = currentView;
    }

    public TYPE getCurrentView() {
        return currentView;
    }

//usage of setting the enum 
setCurrentView(TYPE.FIRST);

avoid the accessing of TYPE.FIRST.ordinal() it is not recommended always
share|improve this answer
    
That only works if you are not getting your data externally. Since OP said which returns value 1, 2, 3 not a TYPE your method would not work without a reversed switch case that takes 1, 2, 3 and returns a TYPE before going into the switch case he listed.. –  WORMSS Jul 9 at 13:11

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