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I need a generic method for preventing XSS attacks in ASP.NET. The approach I came up with is a ValidateRequest method that evaluates the HttpRequest for any potential issues, and if issues are found, redirect the user to the same page, but in a away that is not threatening to the application. (Source code below)

While I know this method will prevent most XSS attacks, I am not certain that I am adequately preventing all possible attacks while also minimizing false positives. So, what is the most effective way to adequately prevent all possible attacks, while minimizing false positives? Are there changes I should make to the helper class below, or is there an alternative approach or third party library that offers something more convincing?

public static class XssSecurity
{

public const string PotentialXssAttackExpression = "(http(s)*(%3a|:))|(ftp(s)*(%3a|:))|(javascript)|(((\\%3C) <)[^\n]+((\\%3E) >))";

private static readonly Regex PotentialXssAttackRegex = new Regex(PotentialXssAttackExpression, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

public static bool IsPotentialXssAttack(this HttpRequest request)
{
    if(request != null)
    {
        string query = request.QueryString.ToString();
        if(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(query) && PotentialXssAttackRegex.IsMatch(query))
            return true;
        if(request.HttpMethod.Equals("post", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
        {
            string form = request.Form.ToString();
            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(form) && PotentialXssAttackRegex.IsMatch(form))
                return true;
        }
        if(request.Cookies.Count > 0)
        {
            foreach(HttpCookie cookie in request.Cookies)
            {
                if(PotentialXssAttackRegex.IsMatch(cookie.Value))
                {
                    return true;
                }
            }
        }
    }               
    return false;
}

   public static void ValidateRequest(this HttpContext context, string redirectToPath = null)
   {
       if(context == null || !context.Request.IsPotentialXssAttack()) return;

       // expire all cookies
       foreach(HttpCookie cookie in context.Request.Cookies)
       {
           cookie.Expires = DateTime.Now.Subtract(TimeSpan.FromDays(1));
           context.Response.Cookies.Set(cookie);
       }

       // redirect to safe path
       bool redirected = false;
       if(redirectToPath != null)
       {
           try
           {
               context.Response.Redirect(redirectToPath,true);
               redirected = true;
           }
           catch
           {
               redirected = false;
           }
       }
       if (redirected) 
           return;

       string safeUrl = context.Request.Url.AbsolutePath.Replace(context.Request.Url.Query, string.Empty);
       context.Response.Redirect(safeUrl,true);
   }
}
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Why are you looking for alert? This has nothing to do with exploiting xss, an attacker will never use this function to aid in exploitation. –  Rook Nov 13 '11 at 2:23
1  
Trying to write security system against an attack you have never exploited is a serious mistake. Security systems should be very simple. XSS should be prevented by a simple encoding routine. –  Rook Nov 13 '11 at 2:26
1  
@rook, the client whose site I wrote this for is testing the site with HP WebInspect, which uses alert as one of it's test 'attacks' –  smartcaveman Nov 13 '11 at 2:26
    
@rook, i'd love to see an example or reference to one –  smartcaveman Nov 13 '11 at 2:26
2  
If HP WebInspect i using alert to TEST your code, than that is a HUGE reason not to block it. Its very likely that your system is extremely vulnerable to xss because you are fooling your tool without addressing the root of the problem. –  Rook Nov 13 '11 at 2:28
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

what is the most effective way to adequately prevent all possible attacks, while minimizing false positives?

Whitelisting + schemas. Only permit exactly the data you want to permit, then encode it for transport appropriate to the intended end-point (eg, if you're using the input in SQL, you might want to escape it using libraries built to escape potentially dangerous SQL code - not that you should be putting raw input into SQL anyway without a stored proc or equiv...)

Do NOT attempt to blacklist unless it is an extra check for due caution. You will miss something and you will expose yourself to attack.

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Its not even a third party library, Microsoft makes an AnitXss library. Moreover, you can actually set it as the default encoding for asp.net 4+ when <% %> is used in your markup as outlined here and here

Some basic instructions on using it can be found here

share|improve this answer
    
I should have mentioned that it needs to be ASP.NET 2.0 compatible. Do you see a problem with the code I posted? –  smartcaveman Nov 14 '11 at 1:08
1  
I believe this version will work. microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=17389 The technique you are attempting doen't work well. Regex's will almost always miss something. Several well maintained libraries that have attempted to do this have had flaws found in them. There is every reason to think something you or I threw together would fair far far worse. –  imichaelmiers Nov 14 '11 at 1:28
    
@imichaelmiers Here is the link to version 1.5 it is newer than what you link to microsoft.com/download/en/… –  makerofthings7 Nov 14 '11 at 17:20
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