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I am trying to append " " to messages in a chat program. In the below example buf is a character array holding the message. The weird thing is when I send this down a socket with write() it sends it in 2 bursts. The first burst is the correct message, then a second burst is 2-3 random non alphabetic ascii characters. Any idea what is up? When I just send buf down the socket, it works correctly.

char nickmsg[550];
strcpy(nickmsg, "<");
strcat(nickmsg, username);
strcat(nickmsg, "> ");
strcat(nickmsg, buf);
write(sd, nickmsg, sizeof(nickmsg));
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't want sizeof(nickmsg), you want strlen(nickmsg). Using sizeof(nickmsg), you're sending everything that's in that buffer, not just the string you built in it. If it's only the chars in the string you want to send, you need to calculate the length of what's in there. (btw, there are more efficient ways to create strings than repeated strcats)

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wow, that is so obvious... sigh, that is what I get from copying a class example directly -.-". Thanks for your speedy help –  will Nov 13 '11 at 2:21
    
btw, what is the more efficient way? I'm learning C as I go :( –  will Nov 13 '11 at 2:23
1  
@will - try using snprintf() to add pieces to your string. It returns the number of characters added. You can tally these as you go; add new pieces into the buffer at the offset you've accumulated. When you're done, you don't even need to do strlen(), b/c you've already got the length of the string. –  JustJeff Nov 13 '11 at 2:26
    
@will you should accept this answer. It's the polite thing to do. –  kbyrd Nov 13 '11 at 2:27
    
aye kbyrd, I was going to, was waiting for the 10 min period or something after posting a question where it wouldn't let me :) –  will Nov 13 '11 at 2:30

You have this code:

char nickmsg[550];
strcpy(nickmsg, "<");
strcat(nickmsg, username);
strcat(nickmsg, "> ");
strcat(nickmsg, buf);
write(sd, nickmsg, sizeof(nickmsg));

This always sends 550 bytes, since sizeof(nickmsg) is 550. The end of the message will be marked by a zero-byte because nicknmsg is a C-style string.

If the receiver always grabs 550 bytes and ignores all bytes after the zero, this will work fine. You'll just be sending some junk bytes to the clients which might leak sensitive information.

The question is, what are you supposed to be sending? What is supposed to mark the end of the message?

Caution: Do not change sizeof(nickmsg) to strlen(nickmsg). That will leave the client no way at all to identify the end of the message. (Unless you are 100% positive the client does not need to identify the ends of messages.)

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if the recv() asks for 550 chars, that doesn't necessarily mean it will get 550 chars - it will return the number of chars it got. Agreed there's then another problem of dealing with unterminated strings, but that seemed beyond the scope of the question. –  JustJeff Nov 13 '11 at 2:47
    
@JustJeff: You wouldn't want recv to act that way -- what if two messages were ready to be received? Why would you want to have to call recv a second time? By "receiver", I mean the code that breaks the incoming stream of bytes into messages. –  David Schwartz Nov 13 '11 at 3:24
    
Indeed. While the question here was mainly concerned with the sending of data, @will would be advised to take this into consideration! –  JustJeff Nov 13 '11 at 13:20

write() isn't sending extra characters, you are.

write(sd, nickmsg, sizeof(nickmsg));

Will send 500 characters (the size of your array). Since you didn't initialize all array elements to 0 you're getting whatever garbage is in memory past the data you inserted into it.

You want:

write(sd, nickmsg, strlen(nickmsg) + 1);
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If he does that, how will the client know it has received the entire message? He might want strlen(nicknmsg)+1. He might want to add some kind of line ending to the message. –  David Schwartz Nov 13 '11 at 2:33
    
Gah ... fingers faster than brain. Editing. Thx. –  Brian Roach Nov 13 '11 at 2:38

You are sending 500 bytes data, within which only first strlen(username)+3 has valid data. The rest is just the uninitialized data.

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If you send it this way write(sd, nickmsg, sizeof(nickmsg)); you are sending data equivalent to size of the buffer.Though your string may be valid c string ending with null character but still the client may not be treating strings that way.(If you are writing your own client program you may cover up in the client's program).

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