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I've known that this is true:

x[4] == 4[x]

What is the equivalent for multi-dimensional arrays? Is the following true?

x[4][3] == 3[x[4]] == 3[4[x]]
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Did you try it? What happened? –  Carl Norum Nov 13 '11 at 2:52
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@Jim: x[4] == *(x + 4) == *(4 + x) == 4[x] –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 13 '11 at 2:54
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@JimClay Because x[4] == *(x + 4) so 4[x] == *(4 + x). The [] operator is just syntactic sugar. –  Andrew Marshall Nov 13 '11 at 2:55
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Thanks for the explanations. I'm both fascinated and repelled at once. –  Jim Clay Nov 13 '11 at 2:57
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@JimClay: ..and that's what C is really for. repelling and fascinating. –  kbyrd Nov 13 '11 at 2:59
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2 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

x[y] is defined as *(x + (y))

x[y][z] would become *(*(x + (y)) + z)

x[y[z]] would become *(x + (*(y + (z))))


x[4][3] would become *(*(x + (4)) + 3) would become *(*(x + 4) + 3)

3[x[4]] would become *(3 + (*(x + (4)))) would become *(*(x + 4) + 3)

3[4[x]] would become *(3 + (*(4 + (x)))) would become *(*(x + 4) + 3)

Which means they are all equivalent.

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In the case of a multidimensional array int x[5][7] you'd have x[y][z] defined as *(x + 7*y + z). And x[y] would become x + 7*y i.e. the pointer to the indicated slice. But I believe the equivalences still hold, even if the expanded expressions are somewhat longer. If the compiler does accept the code at all, that is. –  MvG Jul 31 '12 at 23:16
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Yes. In each case x is an array which decays to a pointer and then has pointer arithmetic performed on it.

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