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My coworkers and I are putting together a small reporting framework for an online storefront. We've built a library following the repository pattern, using "reports" as the repositories and a very light service layer to interact with said reports. Our code works great, and is pretty easy to use. However, there is one thing that is bothering me personally: at the service factory level, we need to declare our return type twice (it's not inferred). Here's the basis of our project:

The Report Interface

This is what is used as our "Repositories". They take in Data Access Objects, such as wrapper-classes to a SQL/Oracle Connection, or our Storefront's API.

internal interface IReport<T>
{
    T GetReportData(dynamic options);
}

The Repository Factory

This provides an easy way to generate those reports by knowing the type.

internal interface IReportFactory
{
    TR GenerateNewReport<T, TR>() where TR : IReport<T>;
}

internal class ReportFactory : IReportFactory
{
    public ReportFactory()
    {
        // some initialization stuff
    }

    public TR GenerateNewReport<T, TR>() where TR : IReport<T>
    {
        try
        {
            return (TR)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(TR));
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            // Logging
        }
    }
}

An Example Report (Repository)

Here is what a report would look like. Notice that it returns a DataTable, and is declared with that in the generic interface (this will come in to play shortly).

internal class ItemReport : IReport<DataTable>
{
    public DataTable GetReportData(dynamic options)
    {
        return new DataTable();
    }
}

The Report Service

A lightweight service that takes in a report (repository) and works with it. Light, but it allows for easy unit testing and such, and if we ever want to add additional processing after the reports are retrieved, it'd be easy to do so.

public interface IReportService<T>
{
    T GetReportData(dynamic options);
}

public class ReportService<T> : IReportService<T>
{
    private readonly IReport<T> _report;

    public ReportService(IReport<T> report)
    {
        _report = report;
    }

    public T GetReportData(dynamic options)
    {
        return _report.GetReportData(options);
    }
}

The Service Factory

We have the service factory setup as an abstract class (because all service factories will need to create the report factory), forcing a default constructor:

public abstract class ReportServiceFactory
{
    protected IReportFactory ReportFactory;

    protected ReportServiceFactory(connection strings and other stuff)
    {
        ReportFactory = new ReportFactory(connection strings and other stuff);
    }
}

We can then create separate service factories based on function. For example, we have a "standard report" service factory, as well as customer specific service factories. The implementation here is where my question is.

public class SpecificUserServiceFactory : ReportServiceFactory
{
    public SpecificUserServiceFactory(connection strings and other stuff) : base(connection strings and other stuff){}

    public IReport<DataTable> GetItemReport()
    {
        return new ReportService<DataTable>(ReportFactory.GenerateNewReport<DataTable, ItemReport>());
    }
}

Why must I be so verbose when creating the service factory? I declare the return type twice. Why can't I do something like this:

return new ReportService(ReportFactory.GenerateNewReport<ItemReport>());

Notice that I don't declare DataTable in this; I think that it should be inferred from the fact that ItemReport is IReport. Any suggestions on how to get it to work this way would be greatly appreciated.

Sorry for such the long explanation to ask such a simple question, but I figured all that backing code would help come up with a solution. Thanks again!

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There are some errors in the code you show. This question is very big from the usual stack overflow questions. –  Salvatore Previti Nov 13 '11 at 4:18
    
Ok I studied more the code and this code smells... it seems to me a misuse of generics and pattern programming. Don't mix reflection (Activator.CreateInstance) with generics in weird ways... the problem is that IReportFactory should be a generic type instead of exposing a generic method. –  Salvatore Previti Nov 13 '11 at 4:35
    
This is to your original post: First: this was summarized code (internal stuff I didn't want to share and such); not sure if it will compile completely. Second: This needs to return type IReport<T>, as there is a domain requirement of having a certain constructor (I actually call this: return (TR)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(TR), _parameterVariable); this requirement is for dependency injection. Third: This still doesn't get around the issue of stating the return type of DataTable. If at all possible, I'd like to even avoid that via inferring the type. –  Brandon Martinez Nov 13 '11 at 4:39
    
Also, if I shouldn't use Activator.CreateInstance, what should I use? Do I need to make 30+ methods for every report type? Seems to defeat the purpose of a dynamic class factory. –  Brandon Martinez Nov 13 '11 at 4:40
    
You simply cannot infer a generic type in that way, the language don't allows you to do that. A dynamic factory + generics seems a bit strange... generics are used for strong typing your code, dynamic instead requires your code to be less typed, they seems two different things. –  Salvatore Previti Nov 13 '11 at 4:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason you can't omit the DataTable generic type in the calling of GenerateNewReport is because it's a constraint on the other generic type in that function definition. Let's assume (for simplicity's sake) your IReport<T> actually was an interface with a function void Something(T input). A class could implement both IReport<int> and IReport<string>. Then, we build such a class called Foo : IReport<int>, IReport<string>. The compiler would not be able to compile bar.GenerateNewReport<Foo> because it doesn't know if it's binding to the IReport<int> or IReport<string> type and thus cannot determine the appropriate return type for that call.

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Makes sense; thanks! –  Brandon Martinez Nov 15 '11 at 15:32

I don't think the compiler will be able to infer DataTable from ItemReport. But you can avoid specifying DataTable twice by using a static generic method in a non-generic class.

ReportService.Create(reportFactory.GenerateNewReport<DataTable, ItemReport>())
public static class ReportService
{
    public static ReportService<T> Create<T>(IReport<T> report)
    {
        return new ReportService<T>(report);
    }
}
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