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I'm trying to wrap up my script placeholderRX. All I need to do is get the 'px' off the end of the string returned from this call.

$(form).children('.inputSpan').each(function() {
   var $input = $(this)
   var $padding = $input.children('.input').css('padding-left');
});

This returns "6px". I want to trim the 6 px off and make sure it's an integer so I can then add 2 pixels to it and feed it to the css rule. I'm new to string manipulations in javascript. Help me out!

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6  
parseInt('6px') -> 6 // integer; –  Marc B Nov 13 '11 at 3:22
1  
Have a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/590602/… . –  mjwills Nov 13 '11 at 3:23
    
parseInt('6.5px') -> 6 // a PROBLEM; –  Muhammad Umer May 11 at 17:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use a basic javascript replace(), parseInt(), or parseFloat() function to remove "px" from your result. Which method you use, depends on what exactly you need.

The following is a shortened version of your code using parse replace() to remove "px".

$(form).children('.inputSpan').each(function() {
   var padding = $(this).children('.input').css('padding-left').replace("px", "");
});

In the above code, "16px" will return "16". "16.7px" will return "16.7px". "16em" will return "16em".


The following is a shortened version of your code using parse parseInt() to remove "px" and more.

$(form).children('.inputSpan').each(function() {
   var padding = parseInt($(this).children('.input').css('padding-left'));
});

In the above code, "16px" will return "16". "16.7px" will return "16". "16em" will return "16". As opposed to the first replace() example, this will remove any text, not just "px".


The following is a shortened version of your code using parse parseDouble() to remove "px" and more.

$(form).children('.inputSpan').each(function() {
   var padding = parseDouble($(this).children('.input').css('padding-left'));
});

In the above code, "16px" will return "16". "16.7px" will return "16.7". "16em" will return "16". As opposed to parseInt(), this keeps decimals, if you have them for some reason.


Of course, you can keep the code lengthy if there is a reason to see the broken up steps taken for future reference, or if the other variables are used for other reasons. This is the long version using parseInt().

$(form).children('.inputSpan').each(function() {
    var $input = $(this)
    var padding = $input.children('.input').css('padding-left');
    var paddingInt = parseInt(padding);
});

Also, to explain the change in the variable name from $padding to padding. A $ symbol in front of a javascript variable is common usage to distinguish regular javascript variables from jQuery variables, as they have different properties. There is no reason to use $padding because .css() does not return a jQuery object, but rather just a simple string.

In addition, for more complicated searches, you can research regular expressions.

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1  
This is a good answer given the amount of detail; however, I would suggest moving the concise parseInt version to the top. –  wilmoore Nov 13 '11 at 5:18
    
Excellent! Thank you so much for your rundown of these functions! Very helpful. Adding $ to my variables is a habit from working in other languages :/ They just look more appropriate to me and I'm able to distinguish them faster, but I'm working on breaking this habit lol. –  Jacob Nov 13 '11 at 18:21
    
And parseInt is definitely what I'm looking for. What the script does is grab properties from a form input field. It then creates a new span element using the grabbed properties to overlay placeholder text over the input element. Theres then a few functions that obviously make this span operate like a normal placeholder, hiding and showing it ect. I programmed it like this because I wanted the user to have as much control over their input stylings as possible and still allow for the script to function easily. –  Jacob Nov 13 '11 at 18:28
function size(value){
    return( parseInt( value.replace('px','') ,10) ); 
}

Use the function like this:

size("32px"); // Returns 32 as an integer
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1  
You don't need the value.replace(...) section of the code at all - using a simple parseInt() call will remove any trailing non-integer tokens. –  Nightfirecat Nov 13 '11 at 11:41
    
@Nightfirecat I just want to be safe –  Vitim.us Nov 13 '11 at 13:15
    
Unless the string reads something like 3px2, it won't make a difference - it's totally unnecessary. –  Nightfirecat Nov 13 '11 at 21:04
$(form).children('.inputSpan').each(function() {
   var $input = $(this)
   var $padding = $input.children('.input').css('padding-left');

   $padding = $padding.substring(0, $padding.Length - 2);
});
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