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I came across rgba's floating point random number generator:

http://rgba.org/articles/sfrand/sfrand.htm

The explanation is clear and the code is simple. There is one issue: I cannot figure out where the random bits come from. Code snippet below:

static unsigned int mirand = 1;

float sfrand( void )
{
    unsigned int a;
    mirand *= 16807;
    a = (mirand&0x007fffff) | 0x40000000;
    return( *((float*)&a) - 3.0f );
}

I did try to compile this function and always get a result of -0.995993, which makes sense if mirand starts out as 1. What am I missing, or is mirand simply the seed?

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1  
It doesn't always return the same number. If you call it several times in a row you'll see that it returns a different number each time. Of course that sequence will be identical each time you run your program. –  Gabe Nov 13 '11 at 5:10
    
@Gabe: At first I compiled it on codepad.org, ideone.com, and my own machine. I got -0.995993 on both except for ideone.com, which gave me -3 (and is wrong). I ran this function many times now and @aleph_null's answer helped me understand the intention of use. –  Xavier Ho Nov 13 '11 at 5:16
    
Are you saying that if you run the function in a loop you get the same result every time? –  Gabe Nov 13 '11 at 5:35
    
No, I ran the function in a loop and the result is different every iteration. codepad.org/d96GzyBV –  Xavier Ho Nov 13 '11 at 5:38
    
OK, so then you don't get the same result every time you run the function. –  Gabe Nov 13 '11 at 5:41
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Truth is, that code does NOT generate random numbers... it generates pseudo-random numbers. Assuming you start with the same seed, a layman's way to imagine what's happening is that you are just going through a HUGE list of "random" numbers. Eventually, the numbers will repeat themselves, but a good formula is one that makes this repetition happen at a large interval.

To clarify, take a look at the rand formula that Excel uses: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/828795

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That makes sense! Thanks. I just verified your answer here: codepad.org/d96GzyBV Will accept your answer when the timer runs out. :] –  Xavier Ho Nov 13 '11 at 5:12
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The reason you're getting the same number every time is because this is in fact a pseudo random number generator just like regular ones. It has no seed so you will always get the same value on the nth call. If you make several subsequent calls to sfrand you'll see the results, which are uniform between -1 and 1:

-0.995993
0.347347
-0.130602
0.970146
-0.749159
0.883045

Just like if you were to call the normal rand() function without seeding it you'd see the same sequence. As discussed the number 16807 was chosen for good reason, so you can seed this number by calling the function a random number of times:

static unsigned int mirand = 1;

float sfrand(double seed)
{
    unsigned int a;
    mirand *= seed;
    a = (mirand&0x007fffff) | 0x40000000;
    return( *((float*)&a) - 3.0f );
}

int main()
{
    srand(time(NULL));
    int count = rand() % 1000 + 1
    for(int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
        sfrand();
}

This will just discard the first count values while still giving you a random seed, and all subsequent calls will still gain the performance boost intended by the function. Subsequent calls now return unique values:

codys-macbook-pro:~ cody$ ./a.out
0.166836
codys-macbook-pro:~ cody$ ./a.out
0.256372
codys-macbook-pro:~ cody$ ./a.out
-0.194259
codys-macbook-pro:~ cody$ ./a.out
-0.556834
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Actually, you may want to re-read the article. They hand-picked 16807 for a good reason. Still, your explanation agrees with our understanding. :] –  Xavier Ho Nov 13 '11 at 5:18
1  
That they did, I'll edit my answer to include a working random seed. –  Cody Nov 13 '11 at 5:20
    
Hmm, interesting. While I prefer to have a different seed to generate a different sequence, discarding the first n values is certainly logical, although as you said, suffer from an overhead initially. –  Xavier Ho Nov 13 '11 at 5:39
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