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How would I loop through a multidimensional array? Say we had something like this:

class blah
{
    public:
    blah();
    bool foo;
};

blah::blah()
{
    foo = true;
}

blah testArray[1][2];
testArray[1][0].foo = false;

How would I go about looping through testArray to find which one of foo is false?

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1  
Same way you loop through any other array, except the body of the loop will be another loop –  Robert Nov 13 '11 at 6:08
1  
testArray[1][0] is out of range for your declared array –  Tyler Hyndman Nov 13 '11 at 6:14
    
It's pseudocode. Doesn't matter. You can even fly in pseudocode. –  Lemmons Nov 13 '11 at 6:16
    
@Lemmons: I was only pointing it out because if you were testing with that and couldn't find the false value, that may have been your problem. –  Tyler Hyndman Nov 13 '11 at 6:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
class blah
{
    public:
    blah();
    bool foo;
};

blah::blah()
{
    foo = true;
}

int testArrayFirstLength = 1;
int testArraySecondLength = 2;

blah testArray[testArrayFirstLength][testArraySecondLength];
testArray[1][0].foo = false;


for (int i = 0; i < testArrayFirstLength; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < testArraySecondLength; j++) {
        if (!testArray[i][j]) {
            blah thing = testArray[i][j]
        }
    }
}

That good? Or were you looking for something else?

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Yeah that works. Thanks! –  Lemmons Nov 13 '11 at 6:16

This one isn't dependent on magic numbers:

#include <cstddef>
for (size_t x = 0; x < sizeof(*testArray) / sizeof(**testArray); ++x)
for (size_t y = 0; y < sizeof(testArray)  / sizeof(*testArray);  ++y) {
  if (testArray[x][y].foo == false) {

  }
}

Having x in the outer loop leads to better caching.

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1  
+1...but maybe add #include <cstddef> and using std::size_t? It's a pet peeve of mine. What if (not likely, and not in the question) the rows are not all the same length? –  Keith Layne Nov 13 '11 at 6:22
    
@keith.layne I'll add the header, but the std isn't needed. Can array types even be defined with differing rows? –  Pubby Nov 13 '11 at 6:29
    
I feel dumb now, didn't know it was declared in the global namespace. I'm checking on your question. –  Keith Layne Nov 13 '11 at 6:37
    
I guess not, but you could make an array of pointers that are arrays of different lengths, like so: int* a[2]; a[0] = new int[7]; a[1] = new int[4];. I don't think my point really pertains to anything, I'm just your local devil's advocate. I think your technique would work anyway if you adjusted a little and then ordered the loops oppositely...you'd lose your optimization though. I think that's another good question...won't most compilers reorder that loop anyway for the exact same reason? –  Keith Layne Nov 13 '11 at 6:44
int x = 0;
int y = 0;

for( x = 0; x < 1; x++ ){
    for( y = 0; y < 2; y++ ){
       if( testArray[x][y].foo == false ){
           //yeah!
       }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
for (std::size_t i(0); i != 1; ++i){
    for (std::size_t j(0); j != 2; ++j) {
        if (!testArray[i][j].foo) {
            //testArray[i][j].foo is false
            //Perform the required operation
        }
    }
}
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