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I currently have an assignment to create a filesystem in Java. I am trying to implement it to be FAT-like. My concern is that I am not storing or reading each FCB efficiently. Each file has a FCB, which I currently have as:

 ___________________
|                   |
| size of file name |
|___________________|
|                   |
| file name         |
|___________________|
|                   |
| # of data pointers|
|___________________|
| data pointer #1   |
|-------------------|
| bytes to read     |
|-------------------|
| data pointer #2   |
|-------------------|
| bytes to read     |
|-------------------|
| ...               |
|-------------------|
| data pointer n    |
|-------------------|
| bytes to read     |
|___________________|

When I want to read the FCB, I do the following:

1. Get the first four bytes
2. Convert to int -> bytes in file name
3. Read that many bytes for file name
4. Read next four bytes
5. Convert to int -> number of pointers
6. Read 4 * number of pointers
    6a. Read address from pointer #1
    6b. Read number of bytes, starting from address

In the end, my filesystem will be stored as

 ___________________
| number of pointers|
|-------------------|
| FCB#1             |
|-------------------|
| ...               |
|-------------------|
| FCB N             |
|-------------------|
| Data              |
|                   |
|                   |
|___________________|

I am concerned that my overhead is going to be too expensive when storing the FCBs. Is this how I am supposed to do it, though, for FAT, or am I totally misunderstanding it?

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1  
What exactly do you mean by "overhead of storing"? Memory required to keep FCB? Costs of writing it to disk? Cost of parsing it (converting bytes[] -> int etc)? Another thing - what are the data you read in 6a and 6b - is it FCB data or actual file data? –  Andrey Nudko Nov 13 '11 at 10:41
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suspect you may have slightly mis-understood a couple of things, or just need a little guidance in how to better structure your data. I detect several different types of data mixed together, and from experience, that can lead to confusion.

I've implemented a few file systems in my time, and I have found it very convenient to separate as much as possible the types of data into:

1. File data : the file's data.
2. File meta-data : tells you about the file data (where it is found, permissions, ...)
3. File system meta-data : tells you what's free to use and what is not

Depending upon the file system, there may be some overlap. For example, in a FAT based FS such as that used by DosFS, the disk is essentially divided into two parts--the File Allocation Table (FAT) and the data space. The FAT is simply a table of entries that identify which clusters (disk blocks) in the data space have been allocated. However, to help conserve memory it utilizes a couple of tricks ...

1. Each cluster in the data space maps to a unique entry in the FAT.
2. The FAT entry contents identify the NEXT cluster that contains data (it's a linked list).
3. Special FAT entry values are used to mark a free entry, and the end of the chain.
4. Each cluster is the same size.

Directories, can be thought of as special files that follow special rules. Depending upon the FS, directory entries may be of fixed size, or variable size. In the case of the FAT based DosFS using the classic 8.3 naming convention, each entry is the same size. A directory entry must provide you with the means to discover the file name, where to begin finding its data as well as where to find its property data (such as file size and permissions). Some will store all this information directly as part of the entry, others will tell you where to start to find it.

I hope this helps.

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That helped a lot! I have a question about the FAT table, if you can. From reading the fat table, how do you know which file each cluster belongs to? Does this mean that the file meta-data has to be part of each cluster? –  A D Nov 13 '11 at 21:00
    
To figure out if a cluster belongs to a particular file, you need to follow the link-list beginning with the starting cluster number stored in the directory entry that contains the filename. None of the linked-list of FAT entries should be cross-linked with another file. In the case of DosFS, the FAT is used for both file system meta-data as well as file data; however, the key point is that starting cluster (a piece of file meta-data) is stored in the directory record. Again, hope this helps. –  Sparky Nov 13 '11 at 22:21
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