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I'm facing a huge encoding problem in Python when dealing with ISO-8859-1 / Latin-1 character set.

When using os.listdir to get the contents of a folder I'm getting the strings encoded in ISO-8859-1 (ex: ''Ol\xe1 Mundo''), however in the Python interpreter the same string is encoded to a different charset:

In : 'Olá Mundo'.decode('latin-1')
Out: u'Ol\xa0 Mundo'

How can I force Python to decode the string to the same format?. I've seen that os.listdir is returning the strings correctly encoded but the interpreter is not ('á' character corresponds to '\xe1' in ISO-8859-1, not to '\xa0'):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/IEC_8859-1

Any thoughts on how to overcome ?

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To be a bit pedantic: os.listdir() returns bytes. The process that named the file chose to give the file a name with a specific interpretation in iso-8859-1. Filenames could just as easily be stored in BIG-5 or JIS, and os.listdir() wouldn't care. –  sarnold Nov 13 '11 at 8:38
    
@sarnold: os.listdir() can return strings or bytes: it depends upon what you pass in, and on the contents of the directory. –  Thanatos Nov 13 '11 at 21:06

1 Answer 1

When you enter a non-unicode string literal in a python2 interactive session, the system default encoding will be assumed for it.

It appears that you are using windows, and that the default encoding is therefore probably "cp850" or "cp437":

C:\>python
Python 2.7.2 (default, Jun 12 2011, 15:08:59) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import sys
>>> sys.stdin.encoding
'cp850'
>>> 'Olá Mundo'
'Ol\xa0 Mundo'
>>> u'Olá Mundo'.encode('cp850')
'Ol\xa0 Mundo'

If you change the code-page to 1252 (which is roughly equivalent to latin1), the strings will display as expected:

C:\>chcp 1252
Active code page: 1252

C:\>python
Python 2.7.2 (default, Jun 12 2011, 15:08:59) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import sys
>>> sys.stdin.encoding
'cp1252'
>>> 'Olá Mundo'
'Ol\xe1 Mundo'
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