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I am writing an installer in bash. The user will go to the target directory and runs the install script, so the first action should be to check that there is enough space. I know that df will report all file systems, but I was wondering if there was a way to get the free space just for the partition that the target directory is on.

Edit - the answer I came up with

df $PWD | awk '/[0-9]%/{print $(NF-2)}'

Slightly odd because df seems to format its output to fit the terminal, so with a long mount point name the output is shifted down a line

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Use the -P flag to df, you'll get it all on one line. –  Mat Nov 13 '11 at 9:19
3  
related du -hs . to see the disk space in use for current directory. –  here Jun 11 '13 at 22:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Yes:

df -k .

for the current directory.

df -k /some/dir

if you want to check a specific directory.

You might also want to check out the stat(1) command if your system has it. You can specify output formats to make it easier for your script to parse. Here's a little example:

$ echo $(($(stat -f --format="%a*%S" .)))
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Thanks for that! stat looks a bit mind-blowing to me. Reading the man page suggests I don't want -k on my version of df, but putting the path in did help. –  Greg Reynolds Nov 13 '11 at 9:14
    
Ahh - now I see why you use -k, makes the calculations easier! –  Greg Reynolds Nov 13 '11 at 9:19
1  
The thing is a lot of systems will default to 512 byte blocks if you don't specify -k. (coreutils df defaults to 1k blocks, so you're pretty safe on Linux though - but if you have coreutils, you have stat, and that's even safer - no parsing required). –  Mat Nov 13 '11 at 9:21
    
Now I understand what stat is doing, I do like it more. –  Greg Reynolds Nov 13 '11 at 9:26
    
In my Red-Hat something, the format string should be %a*%s instead of %a*%S. I'm not sure if this is a difference or a typo. –  RnMss Jun 27 '13 at 8:00
  1. df command : Report file system disk space usage
  2. du command : Estimate file space usage

Type df -h or df -k to list free disk space:

$ df -h

OR

$ df -k

du shows how much space one ore more files or directories is using.

$ du -sh

-s option summarize the space a directory is using and -h option provides "Human-readable" output.

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