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I know there are ways to fake it, polling (or long polling) but is there any way to have the server contact the browser to push out information?

Either polling option wastes resources on the server and depending on the server can lock it up (apache and iis for example).

Seems like a lot of sites are using long polling to fake a server-side push mechanism over http. Wouldn't it just be better to have a true push protocol built into a browser?

What options are there that are server friendly to push (fake or otherwise) information to web browsers?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I know there are ways to fake it, polling (or long polling) but is there any way to have the server contact the browser to push out information?

The connection must be first established by the client to the server. There's no way of a server contacting a web client.

Either polling option wastes resources on the server and depending on the server can lock it up (apache and iis for example).

That's correct. Frequent Polling is inefficient which is one of the reasons we are moving to a push world with persistent connections. WebSockets will be the best solution for this. I work for Pusher, a hosted realtime WebSocket solution, and we've seen a massive uptake in this technology driven by a community that believe it's the best solution to the resource and realtime communication problem.

Seems like a lot of sites are using long polling to fake a server-side push mechanism over http. Wouldn't it just be better to have a true push protocol built into a browser?

Yes, that's why we now have WebSockets. HTTP solutions to web browsers are ultimately a hack and don't work consistently (in the same way) between browsers.

What options are there that are server friendly to push (fake or otherwise) information to web browsers?

  • HTTP Long-Polling: The connection is held open until the server has new information. Note: this is different to standard polling where requests for new information can be a complete wast of time.
  • HTTP Streaming: This is probably the solution you are looking for (answering the HTTP question). Using this technique the connection is held open and new pieces of information can be pushed over that existing connection, from server to client, without the connection being closed and re-opened as it is with HTTP Long-Polling.
  • WebSockets: The way of the future. Full bi-directional communication over a single TCP connection within a web browser (or any web client). WebSockets are the way of the future!
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Um, no.

Your browser doesn't listen for incoming connections.

Nor would you want it to be able to. We have enough exploits as it is.

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What about RIAs? (i.e. true RIAs like Flex, Silverlight, JavaFx--not huge browser JavaScript libs mimicking RIA behavior) –  Crusader Nov 13 '11 at 9:18
    
What about them? Even if they could bind to an IP:port and accept socket connections (which AFAIK, they can't), nothing from the outside could get to them (provided the user isn't doing something silly like not using a firewall). Trying to support such nonsense would be a nightmare a company/project silly enough to do it. –  Brian Roach Nov 13 '11 at 10:05
    
It's been a while since I've looked into this and honestly I forget some of the details, but I'm pretty sure they keep an open connection for the server to push messages to the client. They can't accept additional connections (socket listen) like a server of course (unless running in AIR in Flex's case), but that's something different. –  Crusader Nov 13 '11 at 10:23
    
"LCDS brings true push messaging to the table because it uses Adobe's proprietary Real Time Messaging Protocol (RTMP) to create a constant connection between itself and the client..." (LCDS is only one way, there's also GraniteDS w/Flex, Red5, and BlazeDS supports a form of push) –  Crusader Nov 13 '11 at 10:24
    
Yes, and you've been able to do the same basic thing in Java with applets since 1996. There's no real magic there, and they certainly aren't built into the browser. Using javascript and a long poll (comet) is pretty much the defacto standard for doing this sort of thing, and it just plain works - no plugin or bloated adobe-ware required. The fact that you have to reconnect every once in a while really isn't that big of deal. –  Brian Roach Nov 13 '11 at 10:28

Real push is likely to be impossible in general, as many client systems are behind NAT or firewall that prevent outsiders from initiating a connection. Wikipedia lists some alternatives.

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If you're using RIA technology like Adobe Flex, I believe the Flex version of a "server push" (AMF messaging) would meet your definition of a server push.

Of course you can also do the primitive ajax-y (hacky) polling method too, but there's no reason unless you're forced to.

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You don't need to "fake" anything. Flash has a really nice and well fleshed out Socket object that works brilliantly, and you can write a tiny little Flash app that talks out to the web page, so you don't have to do anything in Flash other than the communication with the server (if you would prefer to build the page in HTML). You'll need a server side socket listener, of course, but those are pretty easy to throw together as well. Lots of documentation on-line for how to implement the whole thing.... Here's the first example I found (didn't look it over too closely, but looks like it would work nicely). http://www.giantflyingsaucer.com/blog/?p=205

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I don't see that this solves the problem: the Flash app is client-side and connects to the server, not vice versa. What the question is after is a way for the server to contact the client. –  ibid Nov 13 '11 at 9:29
    
Well... the client in absolutely every situation has to contact the server first. But after it connects it stays connected (as long as the user is on the page) and continues to receive communication from the server. What situation are you trying to solve? The user has to arrive at the web page at some point, right? That's the moment where the client connects. And until they leave, the socket stays opened (unless something goes wrong). How are you envisioning this? (meaning... what were you hoping for?) –  Genia S. Nov 13 '11 at 9:39
    
You have been able to do the same thing with a Java applet since about 1996. It's still not "push" any more than a long poll (comet) is; the only difference is that a long poll has to reconnect every once and a while. –  Brian Roach Nov 13 '11 at 10:04
    
@DrDredel Exactly. Flash/Flex apps, not to mention Java and probably Silverlight. I fail to see why Brian insists that since Java could do this for years, the fact that Flash can do this is not relevant. Clearly the "AJAX" anti-plugin special interest group is being well represented tonight. Fact of the matter is, regardless of who's opening the connections (Flash in this case), it's a "real" server push, and it's Flash. So Apple can take that fact and shove it. :) –  Crusader Nov 13 '11 at 10:42

I would think WebSockets (see http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebSocket) is real push, so the answer would be: it depends upon the browser. If you need wide compatibility, the best you can do today is JavaScript libraries that will choose the best available protocol for the browser it's running in (e.g. https://github.com/ffdead/jquery-graceful-websocket). But you wanted server-friendly, and supporting multiple protocols is not server friendly. The current state-of-the-art is that doing cool stuff that works across browsers is engineering-intensive.

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Websockets do not operate over HTTP though. That is one of the main advantages (no HTTP overhead) –  steveax Dec 1 '11 at 7:27
    
There is an initial HTTP handshake. Similar to HTTP Streaming actually - although in web browsers the buffer (XHR.responseText) does get very big and eventually the connection will need to be dropped and re-established. –  leggetter Dec 1 '11 at 12:16

As others stated it is impossible for server to contact client without client request (on regular HTTP).

But if you looking for clean solution for push notificatinons, then look at Server-Sent Events. It is regular HTTP and works seamless with most of the browsers which support HTTP 1.1.

SSE works only in a single direction (server -> client), which is the main mechanic for push notifications. For client-> server communication you can always use Ajax. I made a summarize of this in Which technology for realtime communication for a web app?

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