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I have a very basic doubt here. I have two very simple C codes and their assembly codes:

program 1:

main()

{

    int temp1, temp2, temp3;
    char temp5, temp6, temp7, temp8, temp9;
    temp1 = 5;
    temp1 = 9 - temp1;
}

Assembly:

   0x080483b4 <+0>: push   ebp    
   0x080483b5 <+1>: mov    ebp,esp    
   0x080483b7 <+3>: sub    esp,0x20    
   0x080483ba <+6>: mov    DWORD PTR [ebp-0xc],0x5    
   0x080483c1 <+13>:    mov    eax,0x9    
   0x080483c6 <+18>:    sub    eax,DWORD PTR [ebp-0xc]    
   0x080483c9 <+21>:    mov    DWORD PTR [ebp-0xc],eax    
   0x080483cc <+24>:    leave      
   0x080483cd <+25>:    ret  

Program 2:

main()    
{    
    int temp1, temp2, temp3;
    char temp5, temp6, temp7, temp8, temp9;
    temp1 = 5;
    temp1 = 9 + temp1;    
}

Assembly:

   0x080483b4 <+0>: push   ebp    
   0x080483b5 <+1>: mov    ebp,esp    
   0x080483b7 <+3>: sub    esp,0x20    
   0x080483ba <+6>: mov    DWORD PTR [ebp-0xc],0x5    
   0x080483c1 <+13>:    add    DWORD PTR [ebp-0xc],0x9    
   0x080483c5 <+17>:    leave      
   0x080483c6 <+18>:    ret

Why in the case of subtraction, eax register need to be used and not in the case of addition. Can't it be like:

0x080483c1 <+13>:   sub    DWORD PTR [ebp-0xc],0x9

instead of -

0x080483c1 <+13>:   mov    eax,0x9

0x080483c6 <+18>:   sub    eax,DWORD PTR [ebp-0xc]
share|improve this question
    
no. In the C code, you are subtracting a variable from 9. In your assembly you should be subtracting a register from 9, which is that of the assembly code and not sub DWORD PTR [ebp-0xc],0x9 . On the assembly code, eax is subtracted with 5. In your premise, you are subtracting 5 with 9. –  Neigyl R. Noval Nov 13 '11 at 11:36
    
did you compile with optimizations turned on? –  ninjalj Nov 13 '11 at 11:37
    
@ninjalj: Obviously he didn't. Because otherwise the whole thing would surely have been optimized to a single ret. –  celtschk Nov 13 '11 at 14:00
    
@celtschk: Sure. My point was that noone should care about unoptimized compiler output, it's supposed to be massaged later by the optimizer, so can be quite crappy. –  ninjalj Nov 13 '11 at 14:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'm guessing because addition is commutative (A + B == B + A), whereas subtraction is not (A - B != B - A). Because of this the addition of 9 + temp1 is the same as temp1 + 9, hence the simpler assembler sequence. 9 - temp1 involves creating a temporary variable.

share|improve this answer
3  
you meant commutative: associative means (A + B) + C == A + (B + C) –  Christoph Nov 13 '11 at 12:07
2  
I did indeed Cristoph, two decades since my last math class and two many beers between this and then. –  Shane MacLaughlin Nov 13 '11 at 12:39

temp1 = 9 - temp1; is the same as temp1 = - temp1 + 9;. This carries out 2 operations:

  1. Negate temp1
  2. Do the addition

eax is used as the temporary location to save the middle value.

In the addition case, there's no "middle value", the operation can be done directly.

share|improve this answer

The actual reason for the observed behaviour has been implied by the other answers, but never explicitly mentioned:

Common instruction sets feature ops for the following computations:

%register := %register + $immediate [1]
%register := %register - $immediate [2]

Because of commutativity, [1] can also be used to compute

%register := $immediate + %register

However, a dedicated op for

%register := $immediate - %register

is in general not available, which means it has to be emulated, eg by the sequence

%temp     := %register
%register := $immediate
%register := %register - %temp
share|improve this answer

The reason is a lack of symmetry in the x86 instruction set, which doesn't contain an instruction for subtracting a register from a constant.

For example, the ARM instruction set contains the RSB (Reverse SuBtract) instruction exactly for this purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually the ARM instruction set is the non symmetrical in this case - it lacks a (of course useless) reverse add instruction, where x86 in this case is symmetrical - it lacks both instructions, the useful reverse subtract and the useless reverse addition. The deeper reason for this (and the need for an reverse sub) is of course the lack of symmetry in the subtraction - it's not commutative. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 13 '11 at 18:36
    
The symmetry in this case is between the two ways to do subtraction. –  starblue Nov 13 '11 at 21:47
    
Incidentally, PIC brand microcontrollers have a 'subtract W from constant' instruction, but no 'subtract constant from W register', since the latter instruction could be simulated by adding 256-constant. –  supercat Feb 6 '12 at 2:55

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