Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a web application currently which uses a freemium model. Pro users have to pay a yearly fee for using the application.

The webapp uses some javascript code which was written by a third person and licensed under BOTH MIT and GPL. My questions are :

  1. Is it legally right to use the code - with modification and without modification?
  2. Do I have to notify the original author of the code?
share|improve this question
    
Does the license say you can use it? Does the license say you can modify it? Does the license say you have to notify the original author? –  Quentin Nov 13 '11 at 11:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Is it legally right to use the code - with modification and without modification?

That depends on your type of use, and the licensing. I'm not a lawyer but a software developer, and from what I know, both MIT and GPL allow usage with or w/o modification, even if you sell the software.

Just read through the license, the information is given therein. If you have a problem to fully understand the license, you can go to a lawyer with your and the the third-party code and ask for clarification.

Do I have to notify the original author of the code?

MIT and GPL do not require that you notify the original author as far as I know.


Dual Licensed Software

With software available under mutliple licenses you need to find out what the intention was: Do both licenses apply at once or does only one license apply (and you can choose which one).


Related:

share|improve this answer

I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice. Use at your own risk, do your own research, if necessary consult a lawyer. :-)

The MIT license is very permissive, it's fine to use software licensed that way in commercial projects. More on the Wikipedia page on it. Usually with dual-licensed code, you choose which license you're using it under. By making their code available both via the GPL and the MIT license, the person is making their code very widely usable, both in GPL-style projects and in non-GPL-style commercial ones. It's what jQuery does, for instance.

You should always credit those whose work you use, regardless of licensing, of course.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.