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I'm currently working on a project which uses XSL-Transformations to generate HTML from XML. On the input fields there are some attributes I have to set.
Sample:

<input name="/my/xpath/to/node"
       class="{/my/xpath/to/node/@isValid}"
       value="{/my/xpath/to/node}" />

This is pretty stupid because I have to write the same XPath 3 times... My idea was to have some kind of post-processor for the xsl file so i can write:

<input xpath="/my/xpath/to/node" />

I'm using using something like that to transform my xml

import javax.xml.transform.Transformer;
import javax.xml.transform.TransformerFactory;

import org.dom4j.Document;
import org.dom4j.io.DocumentResult;
import org.dom4j.io.DocumentSource;

public class Foo {

    public Document styleDocument(
        Document document, 
        String stylesheet
    ) throws Exception {

        // load the transformer using JAXP
        TransformerFactory factory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();
        Transformer transformer = factory.newTransformer( 
            new StreamSource( stylesheet ) 
        );

        // now lets style the given document
        DocumentSource source = new DocumentSource( document );
        DocumentResult result = new DocumentResult();
        transformer.transform( source, result );

        // return the transformed document
        Document transformedDoc = result.getDocument();
        return transformedDoc;
    }
}

My hope was that I can create a Transformer object out of a Document object. But it seems like it has to be a file path - at least I can't find a way to use a Document directly.
Anyone knows a way to achieve what I want?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

My hope was that I can create a Transformer object out of a Document object. But it seems like it has to be a file path - at least I can't find a way to use a Document directly.

You can create a Transformer object from a document object:

    Document stylesheetDoc = loadStylesheetDoc(stylesheet);
    // load the transformer using JAXP
    TransformerFactory factory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();
    Transformer transformer = factory.newTransformer( 
        new DOMSource( stylesheetDoc ) 
    );

Implementing loadStylesheetDoc is left as an excercise. You can build the stylesheet Document internally or load it using jaxp, and you could even write the changes to it you need as another XSLT transform transforming the stylesheet.

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it seems like includes can be resolved by implementing a custom URIResolver (factory.setURIResolver(...)) –  Daniel Nov 14 '11 at 21:20
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Why not skip the postprocessing, and use this in XSLT:

<xsl:variable name="myNode" select="/my/xpath/to/node" />

<input name="/my/xpath/to/node"
   class="{$myNode/@isValid}"
   value="{$myNode}" />

That gets you closer.

If you really want to DRY (as apparently you do), you could even use a variable myNodePath for which you generate the value from $myNode via a template or user-defined function. Does the name really have to be an XPath expression (as opposed to a generate-id()?)

Update:

Example code:

<xsl:variable name="myNode" select="/my/xpath/to/node" />
<xsl:variable name="myNodeName">
  <xsl:apply-template mode="generate-xpath" select="$myNode" />
</xsl:variable>

<input name="{$myNodeName}"
   class="{$myNode/@isValid}"
   value="{$myNode}" />

The template for generate-xpath mode is available on the web... For example, you can use one of the templates for that purpose that comes with Schematron. Go to this page, download iso-schematron-xslt1.zip, and look at iso_schematron_skeleton_for_xslt1.xsl. (If you're able to use XSLT 2.0, then download that zip archive.)

In there you'll find a couple of implementations of schematron-select-full-path, which you can use for generate-xpath. One version is precise and is best for consumption by a program; another is more human-readable. Remember, for any given node in an XML document, there are multitudes of XPath expressions that could be used to select only that node. So you probably won't be getting the same XPath expression that you came in with at the beginning. If this is a deal-breaker, you may want to try another approach, such as ...

generating your XSLT stylesheet (the one you've already been developing, call it A) with another XSLT stylesheet (call it B). When B generates A, B has the chance to output the XPath expression both as a quoted string, and as an expression that will be evaluated. This is basically preprocessing in XSLT instead of postprocessing in Java. I'm not really sure if it would work in your case. If I knew what the input XML looks like, it would be easier to figure that out I think.

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Yes the name has to be the xpath. The problem is that one attribute gets forgotton by the people who write the xsl files. I want to reduce the error-proneness as much as possible. Can you give me an example for your other solution (but i guess the code won't look like "normal" html anymore?!) –  Daniel Nov 13 '11 at 12:52
    
@Daniel, I updated my answer in response to your request. –  LarsH Nov 13 '11 at 14:00
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