Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I realize this is a possible duplicate question, as there a number of those errors reported on Stack Overflow, but none of the solutions seem to apply to my problem.

So I have the following function:

elementAt' :: Integral b => [a] -> b -> a
elementAt' [x:_] 1 = x
elementAt' [x:xs] y = elementAt' xs yminus1
    where yminus1 = y - 1

In case you're wondering it's problem 3 from 99 Haskell Problems. The goal of the function is to take as input a list and an index, and return the value at that index (starting at 1). I don't want a solution to the problem, if I did I could just look at the ones provided. But I'm getting an error I don't understand. I'm using eclipseFP, the eclipse plugin for haskell and it's underlining the "[x:_]" and "[x:xs]" portions of the function with the following error:

Couldn't match type `a' with `[a]'
`a' is a rigid type variable bound by
the type signature for elementAt' :: Integral b => [a] -> b -> a

In all the threads that discuss this error that I've looked at the problem usually occurs when someone tries to give an incorrect output to something which expects a certain type. For example, returning the length of something (which is of type Int) to what should be a "Num a" variable type.

But in my case I'm not even providing a type for variable a. It should be able to be ANYTHING, right? So why am I getting this error? If I understood why I was getting the error I could fix it, but I just don't understand.

Could someone please explain to me why I'm receiving this error?

Your help is much appreciated, thank you. -Asaf

Edit: Every answer provided so far is correct, thank you all for the helpful information. I'm going to pick the one I believe to be most clear (I have to wait 5 minutes to do it though).

share|improve this question
    
why not just write elementAt' [x:xs] y = elementAt' xs (y-1) –  Vixen Jul 17 '12 at 7:57
    
@Vixen How is that different from what I wrote... other than including a variable declaration? Obviously the compiler would end up doing the exact same thing in either case (correct me if I'm wrong). –  Asaf Jul 17 '12 at 13:25
    
Yes, it's the same, I just think it looks strange to declare something as yminus1, when y-1 reads more easily and looks prettier in my opinion –  Vixen Jul 17 '12 at 14:46
    
@Vixen I concur –  Asaf Jul 17 '12 at 17:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to matching list to head and tail, you should use

elementAt' (x:_) 1 = x

So, finally

elementAt' :: Integral b => [a] -> b -> a
elementAt' (x:_) 1 = x
elementAt' (x:xs) y = elementAt' xs yminus1
    where yminus1 = y - 1

And

λ> elementAt' [1,2,3] 2
2

Is it what you need?

share|improve this answer

Entering your definition without type declaration shows that the inferred type is Integral b => [[a]] -> b -> a. That's correct, your current patterns match lists of lists.

A pattern like

f [pat] = ...

matches a singleton list whose sole element matches pat. You want to work with cons a.k.a. (:) instead of requring a certain length, and then you need parenthesis instead of brackets:

elementAt' (x:xs) n = ...

The error basically says "you treat a (the elements of the first argument) as if it was a list".

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for explaining the cause of the problem, not just making the errors go away. –  Matt Fenwick Nov 13 '11 at 14:01

But in my case I'm not even providing a type for variable a. It should be able to be ANYTHING, right?

It has to be able to be anything. According to your type signature the user of your function has to be able to call your function with a being Int, with a being [Char] or with `a´ being whatever else the user wants to.

However the error message is telling you that you defined your function so that it's only possible to call it with a being a list of something. I.e. you defined it, so that the first argument has to be a list of lists - it can't be a list of anything else. And that contradicts your type signature.

share|improve this answer

Use parentheses, not brackets: (x:xs)

module Aaa where

elementAt' (x:_) 1 = x
elementAt' (x:xs) y = elementAt' xs yminus1
    where yminus1 = y - 1
share|improve this answer
    
Although you understand the solution, the asker may not -- you've not addressed Could someone please explain to me why I'm receiving this error? –  Matt Fenwick Nov 13 '11 at 14:02
    
@delnan gave an explanation above. Generally I try to give more detailed answers. –  nponeccop Nov 13 '11 at 14:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.