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I want to shade the region where top 10% are localized. I just arbitrary put truncation point 65, to just plot this plot. That is what I intend to find...for every data sets.

xf <- rnorm(40000, 50, 10);
plot(density(xf),xlim=c(0,100), main = paste(names(xf), "distribution"))
dens <- density(xf)
x1 <- min(which(dens$x >= 65)) # I want identify this point such that 
# the shaded region includes top 10%

x2 <- max(which(dens$x <  max(dens$x)))
with(dens, polygon(x=c(x[c(x1,x1:x2,x2)]), y= c(0, y[x1:x2], 0), col="green"))
abline(v= mean(traitF2),  col = "black", lty = 1, lwd =2)

enter image description here

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think you are looking for the quantile() function:

xf <- rnorm(40000, 50, 10)
plot(density(xf),xlim=c(0,100), main = paste(names(xf), "distribution"))
dens <- density(xf)
x1 <- min(which(dens$x >= quantile(xf, .90))) # quantile() ftw!

x2 <- max(which(dens$x <  max(dens$x)))
with(dens, polygon(x=c(x[c(x1,x1:x2,x2)]), y= c(0, y[x1:x2], 0), col="green"))

enter image description here

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You are looking for the quantiles. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantile

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2  
thank you for help...however as this seems a great comment not answer please improve it as an answer ...right cost some of my reputation, just kidding –  jon Nov 13 '11 at 14:04
    
Why was this downvoted? It answers the question! –  Andy W Nov 13 '11 at 14:05
    
The question seems to be a perfect question to google if you just know what you are looking for, therefore my short answer... –  Niclas Nov 13 '11 at 14:05
    
@John ,the downvote IMO is quite harsh. What you are asking for is the quantiles/percentiles of the distribution. It should not be necessary to provide a complete programmatic implementation to answer your question. –  Andy W Nov 13 '11 at 14:06
1  
I think the downvote could be justified on the grounds that a link to Wikipedia is not as useful as a link to an R-function "quantile". –  Carl Witthoft Nov 13 '11 at 14:11

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