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I am trying to use the data I have received from a php script, which was json_encode'd, but I just don't seem able to get it right.

This is the javascript function I am using JS:

function dispJSON(items) {
  console.log('Raw from PHP:' + items);
  var strJSON = JSON.stringify(items);
  console.log('Sent from PHP and stringified:' + strJSON);
  $('#results').append(strJSON + '<hr>');
  var opStr =  '';
  for (i=0; i<items.length; i++){    //Get each Record
    console.log('REC=' + items[i].tostring);
    for (var key in items[i]) {
      console.log(key + ' => ' + items[i][key]);
    }
  }
}

and this is what the console says. Console:

WCIT.html:60  Sent from PHP and stringified:[[{"vehGrpName":"Austin","vehTitle":"Austin A30 (AS3 and AS4)","vehDescrip":"The new look Baby Austin to rival the Morris Minor."}],[{"vehGrpName":"Austin","vehTitle":"Austin A35","vehDescrip":"An improved A30.  Better brakes, gearbox and engine."}]]
WCIT.html:64  REC=undefined
WCIT.html:66  0 => [object Object]
WCIT.html:64  REC=undefined
WCIT.html:66  0 => [object Object]

So I have obviously misunderstood some basics. My javascript / json knowledge is very limited.

I seem to be getting One Array (All the records), made up of two arrays (ie each record, which contains a json object of the record)

My code is obviously garbage, so if anyone can put me right, I would be most grateful.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Did you mean items[i].toString()? – Salman A Nov 13 '11 at 15:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your dispJSON function, you're no longer dealing with JSON (which is a textual data notation) at all — something somewhere along the line has deserialized it for you (which is handy). You're dealing with the resulting array. From the look of the stringified copy, it's an array of arrays, and each entry in the sub-arrays (which oddly only have one entry each) is an object with various properties:

[
    [
        {
            "vehGrpName": "Austin",
            "vehTitle": "Austin A30 (AS3 and AS4)",
            "vehDescrip": "The new look Baby Austin to rival the Morris Minor."
        }
    ],
    [
        {
            "vehGrpName": "Austin",
            "vehTitle": "Austin A35",
            "vehDescrip": "An improved A30.  Better brakes, gearbox and engine."
        }
    ]
]

(jsonlint is handy for pretty-printing structures.)

So you'll want to loop through that and deal with each of the sub-arrays and their entries (live copy):

function dispStuff(items) {
    var outer, inner, sub, entry;

    for (outer = 0; outer < items.length; ++outer) {
        sub = items[outer];
        for (inner = 0; inner < sub.length; ++inner) {
            entry = sub[inner];
            console.log("Entry " + outer + "," + inner + ":");
            console.log("vehGrpName = " + entry.vehGrpName);
            console.log("vehTitle = " + entry.vehTitle);
            console.log("vehDescrip = " + entry.vehDescrip);
        }
    }
}

Or if you don't want to have the entry keys in your code (live copy):

function dispStuff(items) {
    var outer, inner, sub, entry, name;

    for (outer = 0; outer < items.length; ++outer) {
        sub = items[outer];
        for (inner = 0; inner < sub.length; ++inner) {
            entry = sub[inner];
            console.log("Entry " + outer + "," + inner + ":");
            for (name in entry) {
              console.log(name + " = " + entry[name]);
            }
        }
    }
}

That works because for..in loops through the names of the properties in an object (as well as the property names of any of its prototype objects), and because you can refer to an object property in two different ways: In the familiar obj.propName form where propName is a literal, or in the obj["propName"] form, where the property name is a string. And of course, since it's a string, it can be the result of any expression.


Separately: You might want to find out why your PHP code is creating the sub-arrays with one entry each...

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks for helping. Before we go to the PHP side. In your live example vehGrpTitle and vehGrpDescrip are returning 'undefined', yet they exist as strings. Also I did not want my code to have to refer to key values. Can I somehow not refer to the key values via the index values eg Array[0 etc] for the record and Array[0][1] for the second field in the first record. Thanks again. – mcl Nov 13 '11 at 14:30
    
I think I have caused confusion the field names vehGrpTitle and vehGrpDescrip do not have Grp in them. They should be vehTitle and vehDescrip - apologies The PHP is as follows ` $select = "SELECT vehGrpName, vehTitle, vehDescrip FROM vehicles LIMIT 20"; $result = mysql_query($select) or die(mysql_error()); //query $recs = array(); if(mysql_num_rows($result)) { while($post = mysql_fetch_assoc($result)) { $recs[] = array($post); } } // 3) echo result as json header('Content-type: application/json'); echo json_encode($recs); ` – mcl Nov 13 '11 at 15:16
    
@mcl: Sorry, I had a typo in the example (vehGrpTitle rather than vehTitle, and similar on the description). And sure, your code can loop through the property names rather than knowing them in advance, I added an example of that. – T.J. Crowder Nov 13 '11 at 15:18
    
This is excellent and slowly sinking in. Ultimately I wish to be able to access any part of any record by FieldName. Something like – mcl Nov 13 '11 at 15:31
    
@mcl: You can: items[0][0].vehTitle is the first vehicle's title ("Austin A30 (AS3 and AS4)") items[1][0].vehTitle is the second vehicle's title ("Austin A35"). – T.J. Crowder Nov 13 '11 at 15:38

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