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I have a list like the following:

mylist = [('a', [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)]),
         ('b', [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)]),
         ('c', [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)])]

which I got after different operations in the code.

Is it possible to get an output like the following?

newlist = [('a', [0.5, 1.5, 2.5]),
          ('b', [0.5, 1.5, 2.5]),
          ('c', [0.5, 1.5, 2.5])]

The input list has the contents as ranges and the output list is generated by taking the average of the two numbers from each range. Thank you.

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4  
Neither of the two snippets is valid Python. –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 13 '11 at 14:23
    
You mean something like (array['a'][i][0] + array['a'][i][1]) / 2? (not that this is really valid Python either) –  Polynomial Nov 13 '11 at 14:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
>>> l = [('a', [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)]),
... ('b', [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)]),
... ('c', [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)])]
>>> newl = [(i[0], [(j[0]+j[1])/2 for j in i[1]]) for i in l]
>>> newl
[('a', [0.5, 1.5, 2.5]), ('b', [0.5, 1.5, 2.5]), ('c', [0.5, 1.5, 2.5])]

This works in Python 3; in Python 2, you need

>>> newl = [(i[0], [(j[0]+j[1])/2.0 for j in i[1]]) for i in l]

These list comprehensions are equivalent to the following, more verbose code:

>>> newl = []
>>> for i in l:
...     temp = (i[0], [])
...     for j in i[1]:
...         temp[1].append((j[0]+j[1])/2.0)
...     newl.append(temp)
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@ Tim Hi, I tried the above code but I got an error as "TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for /: 'str' and 'float'" Thank you. –  zingy Nov 17 '11 at 9:45
    
Which error did you get? –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 17 '11 at 9:47

List comprehensions are nice, but my favorite Pythonic technique is map(), which applies a function to every element of a structure:

ls = (('a', [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)]),
      ('b', [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)]),
      ('c', [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)]))

for li in ls:
    print(li[0], list(map(lambda x: sum(x)/len(x), li[1])))

As Tim says, this works for Python 3, you'd need a float(len(x)) for Python 2.

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To work with just one of your lists (the valid python portion), you could use a list comprehension:

numbers = [(0,1), (1,2), (2,3)]

print [sum(x) / float(len(x)) for x in numbers]

This should get you in the right direction, and gives you:

[0.5, 1.5, 2.5]
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