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I have a method that is being executed on a background thread. From that method I'm trying to dispatch_async a block on the main thread. The block uses a local C++ object which is supposed to be copy constructed according to the Apple reference. I'm getting a segmentation fault and from the trace I see that something very sketchy is going on. Here's the simplified version of my code.

struct A
{
    A() { printf("0x%08x: A::A()\n", this); }
    A(A const &that) { printf("0x%08x: A::A(A const &%p)\n", this, &that); }
    ~A() { printf("0x%08x: A::~A()\n", this); }
    void p() const { printf("0x%08x: A::p()\n", this); }
};

- (void)runs_on_a_background_thread
{
    A a;
    a.p();
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        printf("block begins\n");
        a.p();
        printf("block ends\n");
    });
}

And this is the output:

0xbfffc2af: A::A()
0xbfffc2af: A::p()
0xbfffc2a8: A::A(A const &0xbfffc2af)
0x057ae6b4: A::A(A const &0xbfffc2a8)
0xbfffc2a8: A::~A()
0xbfffc2af: A::~A()
0xbfffdfcf: A::A(A const &0x57ae6b4)
0xbfffdfcf: A::~A()
block begins
0xbfffdfcf: A::p()
block ends
0x057ae6b4: A::~A()

There are two things that I don't understand. The first one is why by the time it gets to 0xbfffdfcf: A::p() the destructor on that object has been called already.

The second thing I'm struggling with is why there are so many copy constructors being called. I expect one. That should happen when a copy of a is created to be captured by the block.

I'm using Xcode 3.2.5 with GCC. I experience the same behavior on the simulator and on the device.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I just tested this on LLVM 3.0.

0xb024ee18: A::A()
0xb024ee18: A::p()
0xb024ee04: A::A(A const &0xb024ee18)
0x06869364: A::A(A const &0xb024ee04)
0xb024ee04: A::~A()
0xb024ee18: A::~A()
block begins
0x06869364: A::p()
block ends
0x06869364: A::~A()

As you can see the destructors get called appropriately in this case, I'd chalk this up to a complier bug in the extremely outdated compiler you're using.

The copies in this instance seem inline with what I'd expect. The block copies the stack based object into the block when it gets captured. And then again when the block gets copied from the stack to the heap.

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1  
First copy is on the original stack (block capture) when the block is created. Second is on the heap from the block_copy that happens later. –  Firoze Lafeer Nov 13 '11 at 20:58
    
Yea, realized that shortly after I wrote that, forgot the capture will copy it. –  Joshua Weinberg Nov 13 '11 at 21:00
    
And what about the third copy in the original code? –  detunized Nov 13 '11 at 22:24
    
LLVM seems to be saner here. Two copies I can understand. Too bad upgrading is a major PITA since I would have to first upgrade to Lion. –  detunized Nov 13 '11 at 22:34
    
The third copy looks like a bug :) –  Joshua Weinberg Nov 13 '11 at 22:38

I guess that the multiple copies are caused by the block being copied implicitly a couple of times by the compiler, though I don't see why the block needs to be copied, you'd think that the one instance can be referenced directly when the block is sent to the main thread.

Ignoring the multiple copies, it seems the block should have used the 0x057ae6b4 instance of A since that is the one that survives all the copies and is freed after the block ends. Sounds like a compiler bug to me.

In any case, what you are doing is extremely anti-C++ and I recommend that you revise this code so that it has a more predictable behavior. The problem I have with your code is that you are using a stack allocated object in a block of code that will execute asynchronously at some undetermined time in the future, long after the function that owns that stack allocated object ended. To support this kind of thing the compiler has to generate a copy of your object under the covers, yet if you look at the code there is no indication that the a inside the block is a copy of the a declared outside. If you need to support this kind of thing I think you will be better off converting your C++ class to Objective-C, then you'll have a reference counted object that behaves in a more predictable way.

If this object needs to stay in the C++ domain, then I recommend that you allocate it on the heap and manage the destruction of it manually, as is standard for heap allocated objects in C++. For example, you could do something like this:

- (void)runs_on_a_background_thread
{
    A* a = new A();
    a->p();
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        printf("block begins\n");
        a->p();
        delete a;
        printf("block ends\n");
    });
}

If this sounds too raw to you, then you could see if using an auto_ptr or better yet, a shared_ptr works better. I suspect these two will have the same compiler issue seen when you work with A allocated on the stack, since these will also be allocated on the stack. But it might be worth a try.

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1  
The block needs to be copied to survive the stack frame it was allocated in. Blocks start their life on the stack. –  Joshua Weinberg Nov 13 '11 at 20:29
    
@Joshua: Why does it need to be copied three/four times? –  Miguel Nov 13 '11 at 20:46
    
As you can see from my answer it is getting too many times in the askers example. As for why it needs to be copied twice in my example, the block copies the object into the block when it captures it, and then again from the stack block into the heap block when that gets copied by dispatch_async. –  Joshua Weinberg Nov 13 '11 at 20:56
    
Thanks for the advice. That's exactly what I decided to do. I assume auto_ptr would have the same problem as A. Also I don't think it's anti-C++. Apple says that local objects get copy constructed so I expect that kind of behavior. Performance-wise it's not the best way to go for fairly large objects, but that's another story. –  detunized Nov 13 '11 at 22:29
    
What I meant by anti-C++ is that this type of idiom does not exist in pure C++ applications. I agree that Apple supports this and that if the compiler didn't have bugs it would work, but in my opinion if the code reads "a" then I don't think the compiler should replace it with a "copy of a". In regular C++ you would never see that an object gets replaced with a copy under the covers. –  Miguel Nov 13 '11 at 23:31

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