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I have a generic interface, and a few classes implement it. then from a global place, I want to use methods from that interface, yet, I don't know their compiled generic type, so the reference is only their object's class, as showing in runtime. (so I can't get access to the interface methods)

a few questions:

  1. Is it possible to use them?
  2. should I design it without generics?
  3. what is the purpose of generic interfaces if I can't use them at runtime?
  4. can generics out/in or dynamic help in that situation?

edit: some example code

  public interface IMyInterface<T> 
        where T: class, new()
    {
        void Delete (T obj);
    }

public class trigger {}
public class triggervm : IMyInterface<trigger>
{

List<trigger> _trigList = new List<trigger>()
    public void Delete (trigger obj)
    {
        _trigList.Remove (obj);
    }
}

now, say I want to check, and then use the method Delete, from a "global" place:

if (chosenItem is IMyInterface<???>)
{
     var item = chosenItem as      IMyInterface<???>;
     item.Delete(someObj);
}
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4  
Could you post some example code? I'm having trouble understanding exactly what you mean, especially when you say you "can't use them at runtime" (in what way?) –  Cameron Nov 13 '11 at 16:50
    
Moar code. Less english. –  Ritch Melton Nov 13 '11 at 17:48
    
Does the methods you want to call "globally" depend on the generic parameter? –  Albin Sunnanbo Nov 13 '11 at 18:17
    
no, they don't depend on it, and in fact, cannot depend on it, since they're supposed to be added later, like plugins. –  better-than-soil Nov 14 '11 at 9:28
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4 Answers 4

Here's an example of how you can use the functions of a generic interface without having to know what the generic types are when writing the code.

The basic idea is to call your own generic function (in this case CompareValuesInternal) and use reflection to extract the appropriate type information to pass along with the call.

 sm_compare_values_info = typeof(YourType).GetMethod("CompareValuesInternal", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static);

static public bool CompareValues(object x, object y)
{
  bool result = true;

  if ((x == null && y != null) || (x != null && y == null))
  {
    result = false;
  }
  else if (x == null && y == null)
  {
    result = true;
  }
  else if (x is IComparer)
  {
    result = ((x as IComparer).Compare(x, y) == 0);
  }
  else if (x is IComparable)
  {
    result = ((x as IComparable).CompareTo(y) == 0);
  }
  else if (x is IEqualityComparer)
  {
    result = (x as IEqualityComparer).Equals(x, y);
  }
  else if (x.GetType() != y.GetType())
  {
    result = false;
  }
  else
  {
    //----IMPORTANT PART----
    MethodInfo info = sm_compare_values_info.MakeGenericMethod(x.GetType());
    result = (bool)info.Invoke(null, new object[] { x, y });
  }

  return result;
}

static protected bool CompareValuesInternal<T>(T x, T y)
{
  bool result = false;

  if (x is IEqualityComparer<T>)
  {
    result = (x as IEqualityComparer<T>).Equals(x, y);
  }
  else if (x is IEquatable<T>)
  {
    result = (x as IEquatable<T>).Equals(y);
  }
  else if (x is IComparable<T>)
  {
    result = ((x as IComparable<T>).CompareTo(y) == 0);
  }
  else if (x is IComparer<T>)
  {
    result = ((x as IComparer<T>).Compare(x, y) == 0);
  }

  return result;
}
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As for you other questions, I don't know what you are designing so it is hard to say if you should be using generics or not, but if this is the problem you're running into you've likely took a wrong turn or are perhaps misusing a language feature. Generally, when writing code involving generics the user is aware of the generic types so the issue you seem to be having isn't an issue and the code can be written "normally". Lastly, I'm unsure what you mean by your last question. :) –  0rigin Nov 13 '11 at 18:35
    
you're probably right about the wrong turn. the idea was that the interface methods are already explicit about the type to use, not just passing an object. another thing is, in this specific case, the enclosing class can inherit multiple times for different types, when it has a few items. see added sample code. –  better-than-soil Nov 14 '11 at 9:48
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Yes, using dynamic can be the simplest and best way to cope with this issue. Jon Skeet's C# in action mentions this as well in the section about dynamics.

As others said, more code less english and we all can narrow this down here.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

like thomas suggested, I use dynamic,

and like "RedHat" suggested, I have the enclosing class inherit from both my interface (IClipboard<T>) and a parent interface (IClippable) that is just a "grouping" interface.

myinterface inherits from the grouping interface, so any class that implements myinterface also matches the grouping one. so I can check if the selected item is IClippable.

the cleanest I could get with my current knowledge of the language.

better support in C# would be nice.

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interface IInterface<T>
{
    Type GetMyType();
}
class MyClass1 : IInterface<int>
{
    public Type GetMyType()
    {
        return typeof(int);//each subclass must be return own generic type
    }
}

static void Main()
{
    new MyClass1().GetMyType()==typeof(int);//Is True
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your efforts, this is quite nice. however, suppose I can't know of "int" in compile time? –  better-than-soil Nov 14 '11 at 9:45
    
with example you write, it is better your generic interface inherited from a non generic interface and global method define in that inteface –  Reza ArabQaeni Nov 14 '11 at 11:18
    
good observation, I have done that. it has a little drawback that the parent interface has to be public too. –  better-than-soil Nov 16 '11 at 8:02
    
eventually, I have settled on using 'dynamic', and run into extension methods are not supported in dynamic, but all is well. I just use the static version. –  better-than-soil Nov 16 '11 at 8:02
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