Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

main.h

#define  DATA  struct   data
DATA
{
  int id;
  char data;
}

main.c

DATA *listOfData[100];

So at this point I will/should be able to access DATA in the list like this:

printf(listOfData[5]->data);

It isn't letting me do it, the run just freezes on that last print f...no error or anything.

share|improve this question
4  
Don't hide keywords behind #defines. You confuse yourself. –  wildplasser Nov 13 '11 at 17:51
    
The defines are part of the framework/pseudo code my prof gave me –  Jeremy Guy Nov 13 '11 at 17:54
7  
Well: tell him to stop doing that! –  wildplasser Nov 13 '11 at 17:57
add comment

3 Answers 3

This is because you have defined an array of pointers. But you never initialized any of the pointers.

Therefore:

printf(listOfData[5]->data);

will crash (undefined behavior) because you are dereferencing the (invalid) pointer at index 5.

*(And that's a very odd way to define a struct...)

To fix this issue, you will need to allocate for each of the pointers in the array. If you don't actually need it to be an array of pointers, then it might be better to just make it array of the struct itself:

DATA listOfData[100];

and access it as:

listOfData[5].data

Then you don't have to deal with allocating each element.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm not sure why printf would just freeze, but there's a couple of things wrong with this. First, all the pointers in your DATA* array are uninitialized. You probably intended to make an array of DATA, instead of an array of DATA pointers:

DATA listOfData[100];

You also didn't end the struct with a semicolon, so it seems unlikely that this would even compile:

#define  DATA  struct   data
DATA
{
  int id;
  char data;
};

Finally, you're using printf in a rather unsafe way; the first argument needs to be a format string, or you can get weird behavior if the first argument has a % in it:

printf("%c\n", listOfData[5].data);
share|improve this answer
add comment

You haven't shown any memory allocation for the DATA *. Either declare your array as an array of struct data, like:

DATA listOfData[100];

or allocate memory dynamically and assign the pointers in your array.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.