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I'm trying to provide all *.cpp files in a folder to the c++ compiler through ant. But I get no further than ant giving gpp a giant string containing all the files. I tried to prove it by using a small test application:

int main( int argc, char**args ){
   for( --argc; argc != 0; --argc ) printf("arg[%d]: %s\n",argc,args[argc]);
}

With the ant script like this:

    <target name="cmdline">
            <fileset id="fileset" dir=".">
                    <include name="*"/>
            </fileset>
            <pathconvert refid="fileset" property="converted"/>
            <exec executable="a.exe">
                    <arg value="${converted}"/>
            </exec>
    </target>

My a.exe's output is this:

[exec] arg[1]: .a.cpp.swp .build.xml.swp a.cpp a.exe build.xml

Now here's the question: how do I provide all files in the fileset individually as an argument to the executable?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is what the apply task in ANT was designed to support.

For example:

  <target name="cmdline">
        <apply executable="a.exe" parallel="true">
            <srcfile/>               
            <fileset dir="." includes="*.cpp"/>
        </apply>
  </target>

The parallel argument runs the program once using all the files as arguments.

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now that's what I was looking for! Thanks! –  xtofl Nov 15 '11 at 19:11

Found it: the difference seems to lie in arg value vs. arg line.

<arg line="${converted}"/>

resulted in the expected output:

 [exec] arg[5]: C:\cygwin\home\xtofl_2\antes\build.xml
 [exec] arg[4]: C:\cygwin\home\xtofl_2\antes\a.exe
 [exec] arg[3]: C:\cygwin\home\xtofl_2\antes\a.cpp
 [exec] arg[2]: C:\cygwin\home\xtofl_2\antes\.build.xml.swp
 [exec] arg[1]: C:\cygwin\home\xtofl_2\antes\.a.cpp.swp
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small confusion.. did you forget to change <arg value> to <arg line> in your own answer ? –  Pulak Agrawal Nov 14 '11 at 5:26
    
@PulakAgrawal: yes... Too excited :) –  xtofl Nov 14 '11 at 7:56

Have you looked at the ant cpptasks? This would allow you to integrate C++ compilation into your Ant build in a more Ant-centric fashion. For example, specifying files to be compiled using a fileset.

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I have; either it's in rigor mortis, or it's dead. (i.e. it doesn't seem to be maintained anymore). Do you have experience with it? –  xtofl Nov 14 '11 at 11:39
    
I worked on a mainly-Java project where it was used to build C code using gcc for a few modules. It is still in use there. Note that it is ant-contrib as a whole (rather than cpptasks in particular) which hasn't seen a new release since 2008. If I was reviewing ant-contrib now having not used it before, I guess I would share your concern. However, I think ant-contrib is still widely used. –  sudocode Nov 14 '11 at 13:32

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