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I have a working rails app with a resque queue system which works very well. However, I lack a good way of actually demonizing the resque workers.

I can start them just fine by going rake resque:work QUEUE="*" but I guess it's not the point that you should have your workers running in the foreground. For some reason nobody seems to adress this issue. On the official resque github page the claim you can do something like this:

PIDFILE=./resque.pid BACKGROUND=yes QUEUE="*" rake resque:work

well - it doesn't fork into the background here at least.

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7 Answers 7

To demonize a process you can use nohup:

nohup cmd &

On resque's github there is a config for monit, that shows how to use nohup, it looks something like this:

nohup bundle exec rake resque:work QUEUE=queue_name PIDFILE=tmp/pids/resque_worker_QUEUE.pid & >> log/resque_worker_QUEUE.log 2>&1
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I had the same problem and the following works for me.

PIDFILE=./resque.pid BACKGROUND=yes QUEUE="*" rake resque:work >>  worker1.log &

You can also redirect STDERR to the same log file.

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Another option you should look into is using the resque pool gem to manage your workers.

You can run resque pool in background by using this command:

resque-pool --daemon --environment production

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One good way is to use God to manage it. It launches a daemonized version of Resque and monitor it. Actually, you can choose between using Resque as a daemon and letting God daemonize Resque. I choose option 2.

A resque.god file example :

rails_env   = ENV['RAILS_ENV']  || "production"
rails_root  = ENV['RAILS_ROOT'] || "/path/to/my/app/current"
num_workers = rails_env == 'production' ? 5 : 2

num_workers.times do |num|
  God.watch do |w|
    w.dir      = "#{rails_root}"
    w.name     = "resque-#{num}"
    w.group    = 'resque'
    w.interval = 30.seconds
    w.env      = {"QUEUE"=>"critical,mailer,high,low", "RAILS_ENV"=>rails_env}
    w.start    = "bundle exec rake -f #{rails_root}/Rakefile resque:work"
    w.stop_signal = 'QUIT'
    w.stop_timeout = 20.seconds

    w.uid = 'myappuser'
    w.gid = 'myappuser'

    w.behavior(:clean_pid_file)

    # restart if memory gets too high
    w.transition(:up, :restart) do |on|
      on.condition(:memory_usage) do |c|
        c.above = 350.megabytes
        c.times = 2
        c.notify = {:contacts => ['maxime'], :priority => 9, :category => 'myapp'}
      end
    end

    # determine the state on startup
    w.transition(:init, { true => :up, false => :start }) do |on|
      on.condition(:process_running) do |c|
        c.running = true
      end
    end

    # determine when process has finished starting
    w.transition([:start, :restart], :up) do |on|
      on.condition(:process_running) do |c|
        c.running = true
        c.interval = 5.seconds
      end

      # failsafe
      on.condition(:tries) do |c|
        c.times = 5
        c.transition = :start
        c.interval = 5.seconds
      end
    end

    # start if process is not running
    w.transition(:up, :start) do |on|
      on.condition(:process_running) do |c|
        c.running = false
        c.notify = {:contacts => ['maxime'], :priority => 1, :category => 'myapp'}
      end
    end
  end
end
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A +1 for resque-pool - it really rocks. We use it in combination with God to make sure that it is always available.

# Resque
God.watch do |w|

  w.dir = RAILS_ROOT

  w.name = "resque-pool"
  w.interval = 30.seconds
  w.start = "cd #{RAILS_ROOT} && sudo -u www-data sh -c 'umask 002 && resque-pool -d -E #{RAILS_ENV}'"
  w.start_grace = 20.seconds
  w.pid_file = "#{RAILS_ROOT}/tmp/pids/resque-pool.pid"

  w.behavior(:clean_pid_file)

  # restart if memory gets too high
  #w.transition(:up, :restart) do |on|
  #  on.condition(:memory_usage) do |c|
  #    c.above = 350.megabytes
  #    c.times = 2
  #  end
  #end

  # determine the state on startup
  w.transition(:init, { true => :up, false => :start }) do |on|
    on.condition(:process_running) do |c|
      c.running = true
    end
  end

  # determine when process has finished starting
  w.transition([:start, :restart], :up) do |on|
    on.condition(:process_running) do |c|
      c.running = true
      c.interval = 5.seconds
    end

    # failsafe
    on.condition(:tries) do |c|
      c.times = 5
      c.transition = :start
      c.interval = 5.seconds
    end
  end

  # start if process is not running
  w.transition(:up, :start) do |on|
    on.condition(:process_running) do |c|
      c.running = false
    end
  end
end

This then gives you a really elegant way to reload code in your workers without interrupting jobs - simply kill -2 your resque-pool(s) when you deploy. Idle workers will die immediately, busy workers will die when they finish their current jobs, and God will restart resque-pool with workers using your new code.

These are our Resque tasks for Capistrano:

namespace :resque do

  desc "Starts resque-pool daemon."
  task :start, :roles => :app, :only => { :jobs => true } do
    run "cd #{current_path};resque_pool -d -e #{rails_env} start"
  end

  desc "Sends INT to resque-pool daemon to close master, letting workers finish their jobs."
  task :stop, :roles => :app, :only => { :jobs => true } do
    pid = "#{current_path}/tmp/pids/resque-pool.pid"
    sudo "kill -2 `cat #{pid}`"
  end

  desc "Restart resque workers - actually uses resque.stop and lets God restart in due course."
  task :restart, :roles => :app, :only => { :jobs => true } do
    stop # let God restart.
  end

  desc "List all resque processes."
  task :ps, :roles => :app, :only => { :jobs => true } do
    run 'ps -ef f | grep -E "[r]esque-(pool|[0-9])"'
  end

  desc "List all resque pool processes."
  task :psm, :roles => :app, :only => { :jobs => true } do
    run 'ps -ef f | grep -E "[r]esque-pool"'
  end

end

You might need to reconnect any DB connections when resque-pool forks workers - check the docs.

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Any gists or updates to this setup as of Late 2013-2014? Examples anywhere? –  Joshua Rountree Jan 15 at 13:51
    
Getting this: `resque:stop' is only run for servers matching {:roles=>:app, :only=>{:jobs=>true}}, but no servers matched Any suggestions? –  Joshua Rountree Jan 15 at 15:19

The BACKGROUND environment variable was added to Resque 1.20; make sure you're not using 1.19 or lower.

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I had 1.17 version and BACKGROUND=yes didn't work for me. Thanks! –  Ivan Linko Dec 17 '13 at 11:39

I also faced this issue, I start worker in cap task, but I got issue

  • BACKGROUND causes worker always in starting mode.
  • nohup process is killed right after finish, we must wait a couple seconds. But unable to append more command after '&'

At last, I must create a shell, let it sleep 5s after nohup... call. My code

desc 'Start resque'
task :start, :roles => :app do
  run("cd #{current_path} ; echo \"nohup bundle exec rake resque:work QUEUE=* RAILS_ENV=#{rails_env} PIDFILE=tmp/pids/resque_worker_1.pid &\nnohup bundle exec rake resque:work QUEUE=* RAILS_ENV=#{rails_env} PIDFILE=tmp/pids/resque_worker_2.pid &\nsleep 5s\" > startworker.sh ")
  run("cd #{current_path} ; chmod +x startworker.sh")
  run("cd #{current_path} ; ./startworker.sh")
  run("cd #{current_path} ; rm startworker.sh")
end

I know this is a situation solution. but it works well in my project

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