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I'm having Codeigniter object scope confusion.

Say I load a model in a controller:

$this->load->model('A');
$this->A->loadUser(123); // loads user with ID 123
// output of $this->A now shows user 123

$this->load->model('B');
$this->B->examineUser ();
// output of $this->A now shows user 345

class B extends Model
{
    public function examineUser ()
    {
        $this->load->model('A');
        $this->A->loadUser(345); // loads user with ID 345
    }
}

I would have thought that $this->A would be different from $this->B->A but they are not. What is the best solution to this issue? It appears the ->load->model('A') in the examineUser () method does nothing because it was loaded in the controller. Then the call to loadUser () inside that method overwrites the stored properties of $this->A. This seems like a bugfest waiting to happen. If I needed global models, I would have use static classes. What I wanted was something scoped pretty much locally to the model object I was in.

Is there a way I can accomplish this but not go way outside of CI's normal way of operating?

Followup/related: Where do most people put there "->load->model" calls? All at the beginning of a controller action? I figured it would be easier -- though perhaps not excellent programming from a dependency injection perspective -- to load them in the model itself (construct or each method).

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also, I'm aware of $this->load->model('A','C') but I guess I only expected to need it when I was using the same model in the same scope (or what I thought was the scope). –  Hans Nov 13 '11 at 20:13
    
It's a little bit nuts. CI isn't so much object oriented, as a very weird way of using objects as namespaces. For example, I've never seen a CI model that stores information about itself. It does seem like it actively fights against proper OO coding. –  Gustav Bertram Nov 13 '11 at 21:05
    
I'm suddenly regretting converting a codebase to CI. These scoping issues are completely opposite of what I thought they were. Don't you battle major variable over-writing issues? –  Hans Nov 13 '11 at 21:12
    
Yeah, CI is completely baffling me here. What if I needed 4 user objects in three different models? I can't even inject them, which would be my preference, because regardless they are there in the "global" $this variable. Now I find I have to create all of my models in the controller and give it a new name (which makes it hard to know exactly what the original model name was). Sigh. I just spent a lot of time converting TO Codeigniter, promising my bosses it would make the code less brittle, but I'm made it more brittle. –  Hans Nov 13 '11 at 21:50
    
Loading our models in the controller is just our convention. We avoid overwriting variables by not keeping any variables on our model objects. It's worked for us for a couple of years now. –  Gustav Bertram Nov 14 '11 at 5:57
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3 Answers

Whenever you use the Loader Class ($this->load->), it will load the object into the main CI object. The CI object is the one you keep referring to as $this->. What you've done is load model A twice into the CI object.

Essentially, all object loaded using the Loader class goes into a single global scope. If you need two of the same type, give them different names, as per $this->load->model('A','C'). I don't know of any way around it unless you revert to using bog-standard PHP.

In my team's code, we generally load the models in the controller's constructor, then load the data to send to the view in the function, often _remap().

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I'm shocked at this. I have worked with CI for a few months now and just ran into this problem for the first time. I'm using functions and objects to avoid these kind of global scope issues and now I find my app riddled with them. –  Hans Nov 13 '11 at 21:06
    
Also, for clarification, you load all of your models that any part of the controller will need in the controller's constructor. If you need a model named 'user' in a model named 'companies' you'd load both of those models in the controller's constructor even if you don't reference them again in the controller, just in the models? –  Hans Nov 13 '11 at 21:08
    
In our code, no model refers directly to another model. If you need to pull data from another model for whatever purpose, you either do it in the controller, or your SQL refers to the underlying table directly. It may be that our code is badly written, but that's the way it currently works. –  Gustav Bertram Nov 13 '11 at 21:12
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This is not how the loader works sadly. CodeIgniter implements a singleton pattern, which will check to see if the class is included, instantiated and set to $this->A then will be ignored if loaded again. Even if you are inside a model, $this->A will be referenced to the super-instance via the __get() in class Model. Alis it, or just do:

class B extends Model
{
    public function examineUser ()
    {
        $user = new A;
        $user->loadUser(345); // loads user with ID 345
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Phil - if you note though, I am only checking if the model has ever been loaded and if not, loading it so I can do the "new $model" thing and return it. If it already exists in _ci_models array I just return a new object (much as your example here). Am I wrong? –  Hans Nov 14 '11 at 13:01
    
Phil, sorry when I grabbed you on Twitter, I meant to have you look at my answer to my question (starts with "Here's what I've decided to do, please comment if you have advice:"). I see that SO might have them out of order here. What do you think about that extending-CI_Loader-idea? –  Hans Nov 14 '11 at 13:09
    
Just do if ($this->load->is_loaded('A')). Thats a fairly new method which is either in 2.0.3 or 2.1.0 which is about to be released. –  Phil Sturgeon Nov 14 '11 at 16:38
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's what I've decided to do, please comment if you have advice:

I've extended the CI Loader class:

<?php

class SSR_Loader extends CI_Loader
{
    function __construct()
    {  
        parent::__construct ();
    }  

/**
 * Model Retriever
 *
 * Written by handerson@executiveboard.com to create and return a model instead of putting it into global $this
 *
 * Based on original 2.0.2 CI_Loader::model ()
 *
 */
    function get_model($model)
    {  
        if (empty ($model))
        {  
            return;
        }  

        $name = basename ($model);

        if (!in_array($name, $this->_ci_models, TRUE))
        {  
            $this->model ($model);  
        }  

        $name = ucfirst($name);
        return new $name ();
    }  
}

Do any CI guru's see a problem with that before I invest time in changing my code a bit to accept the return obj, ala:

// in a controller:
public function test ($user_id=null)
{
    $this->_logged_in_user = $this->load->get_model ('/db/users');
    $this->_viewed_user    = $this->load->get_model ('/db/users');

    $this->_logged_in_user->load($this->session->userdata ('user.id'));
    $this->_viewed_user->load($user_id);
}

I could also do private $_logged_in_user to make it available in the controller but positively force it to be limited to just the current controller and not spill anywhere else, or I could just do $_logged_in_user = $this->load->get_model ('/db/users'); and limit it to just the current method, which is probably what I'll do more often.

This seems like a pretty straightforward way to "fix" this issue (I say "fix" b/c it's not really a bug, just a way of doing things that I think is a bad idea). Anyone see any flaws?

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Remember to accept your own answer. –  Gustav Bertram Nov 17 '11 at 12:16
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