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In Java...

I am creating a class Foo which contains a method doAction(). My requirements:

  1. doAction() must have a default implementation (i.e. function body) in Foo.
  2. All subclasses of Foo must override doAction(), meaning that subclasses will get a compiler error if they do not provide a new implementation.
  3. I need to be able to instantiate Foo.

abstract would work, except that it does not allow me specify a function body for doAction().

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1  
Have your cake or eat it; can't do both... –  duffymo Nov 13 '11 at 20:30
2  
Why must doAction() have a default implementation, if it is only to be ignored by subclasses? –  Matt Ball Nov 13 '11 at 20:32
    
I need to run/test the base class on its own. –  frankadelic Nov 13 '11 at 20:44
    
@frankadelic I wouldn't recommend adding code in the base class exclusively for testing. That's bad practice and confuses future developers and is hard to maintain. What you need is a Mocking framework like Rhino Mocks where for testing purposes, you can specify what you want returned. –  Chaitanya Nov 14 '11 at 5:58
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Edit

It is impossible to simultaneously satisfy all of the requirements, end of story. You must give up at least one condition, and probably consider an entirely different approach to the problem you're trying to solve.


Use two separate methods. Either:

abstract class Foo {

    // Override this method
    abstract void doActionInSubclass();

    // You can't override a final method
    // And you don't want subclases to override this one
    final void doAction () {
        // do whatever default-y things you want here
        doActionInSubclass();
    }
}

Or just make the "required" method completely separate from the one you want to force subclasses to override:

abstract class Foo {
    abstract void mustOverrideThisInConcreteSubclasses();

    final void doAction() {
        // default-y things here
    }
}
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The problem with this solution is that I cannot instantiate Foo. I will update my question to clarify this requirement. –  frankadelic Nov 13 '11 at 22:10
    
It is impossible to simultaneously satisfy all of the requirements, end of story. –  Matt Ball Nov 14 '11 at 11:28
1  
If you want the ability to instantiate the abstract class just to test the default i.e. concrete methods, you can create (in your test source code) a TestFoo extends Foo and then test that. –  Robert Mark Bram Apr 7 '13 at 23:47
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If you give a default implementation to a method in Java, you can't force the subclasses to override it again. If you can, use a template method pattern using a different method name:

public class Foo{

    public abstract void templateMethod();
    public final void doAction(){

    //default implementation

     templateMethod(); // call template method
    }
}
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1  
doAction() should be final, because someone could redefine it in a subclass. –  True Soft Nov 13 '11 at 20:36
    
@True Soft: right thanks..fixed –  Heisenbug Nov 13 '11 at 20:38
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Implement your method in Foo and make it always throw an exception, like UnsupportedOperationException. This will require the subclasses to override the method.

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1  
This won't cause a compiler error, though. –  Matt Ball Nov 13 '11 at 20:31
    
And the user can catch the exception making the program continue anyway. –  Heisenbug Nov 13 '11 at 20:33
    
He wants that method to have a default implementation, not throw exception. –  True Soft Nov 13 '11 at 20:33
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If all subclasses should override it why do you want to provide a default implementation?! it would be pointless since no one would use it. However you probably have some code of your doAction you want to be executed by any subclasses and some code you want to be overridden. In this case you might design as follow:

doAction(){
     //put your default code here...
     specificAction();
}

abstract specificAction();

In this way doAction has its own implementation which is ended by a specificAction invocation which should instead be implemented by subclasses

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as you can see there are many similar answers to your question :) –  Sindico Nov 13 '11 at 20:37
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In the constructor(s) of class Foo you could use reflection:

class Foo {
    public Foo() {
        Class c = getClass();
        if (!c.equals(Foo.class))
        {
            // try/catch omitted for brevity
            Method m = c.getMethod("methodName", new Class[0]);
            if (m.getDeclaringClass().equals(Foo.class))
            {
                throw new Exception("blah blah blah");
            }
        }
    }
}

This won't produce a compile-time error, but since the call to super() in a constructor can't be wrapped with try there's no way for anyone making a subclass to get around it.

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