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I'm trying to familiarize myself with c++11 atomics, so I tried writing a barrier class for threads (before someone complains about not using existing classes: this is more for learning/self improvement than due to any real need). my class looks basically as followed:

class barrier
{
private:
    std::atomic<int> counter[2];
    std::atomic<int> lock[2];
    std::atomic<int> cur_idx;
    int thread_count;
public:
    //constructors...
    bool wait();
};

All members are initialized to zero, except thread_count, which holds the appropriate count. I have implemented the wait function as

int idx  = cur_idx.load();
if(lock[idx].load() == 0)
{
    lock[idx].store(1);
}
int val = counter[idx].fetch_add(1);
if(val >= thread_count - 1)
{
    counter[idx].store(0);
    cur_idx.fetch_xor(1);
    lock[idx].store(0);
    return true;
}
while(lock[idx].load() == 1);
return false;

However when trying to use it with two threads (thread_count is 2) whe first thread gets in the wait loop just fine, but the second thread doesn't unlock the barrier (it seems it doesn't even get to int val = counter[idx].fetch_add(1);, but I'm not too sure about that. However when I'm using gcc atomic-intrinsics by using volatile int instead of std::atomic<int> and writing wait as followed:

int idx = cur_idx;
if(lock[idx] == 0)
{
    __sync_val_compare_and_swap(&lock[idx], 0, 1);
}
int val = __sync_fetch_and_add(&counter[idx], 1);
if(val >= thread_count - 1)
{
    __sync_synchronize();
    counter[idx] = 0;
    cur_idx ^= 1;
    __sync_synchronize();
    lock[idx] = 0;
    __sync_synchronize();
    return true;
}
while(lock[idx] == 1);
return false;

it works just fine. From my understanding there shouldn't be any fundamental differences between the two versions (more to the point if anything the second should be less likely to work). So which of the following scenarios applies?

  1. I got lucky with the second implementation and my algorithm is crap
  2. I didn't fully understand std::atomic and there is a problem with the first variant (but not the second)
  3. It should work, but the experimental implementation for c++11 libraries isn't as mature as I have hoped

For the record I'm using 32bit mingw with gcc 4.6.1

The calling code looks like this:

spin_barrier b(2);
std::thread t([&b]()->void
{
    std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::duration<double>(0.1));
    b.wait();
});
b.wait();
t.join();

Since mingw doesn't whave <thread> headers jet I use a self written version for that which basically wraps the appropriate pthread functions (before someone asks: yes it works without the barrier, so it shouldn't be a problem with the wrapping) Any insights would be appreciated.

edit: Explanation for the algorithm to make it clearer:

  • thread_count is the number of threads which shall wait for the barrier (so if thread_count threads are in the barrier all can leave the barrier).
  • lock is set to one when the first (or any) thread enters the barrier.
  • counter counts how many threads are inside the barrier and is atomically incremented once for each thread
  • if counter>=thread_count all threads are inside the barrier so counter and lock are reset to zero
  • otherwise the thread waits for the lock to become zero
  • in the next use of the barrier different variables (counter, lock) are used ensure there are no problems if threads are still waiting on the first use of the barrier (e.g. they had been preempted when the barrier is lifted)

edit2: I have now tested it using gcc 4.5.1 under linux, where both versions seem to work just fine, which seems to point to a problem with mingw's std::atomic, but I'm still not completely convinced, since looking into the <atomic> header revaled that most functions simply call the appropriate gcc-atomic meaning there really shouldn't bea difference between the two versions

share|improve this question
    
I haven't played with c++11 atomics yet, but I'm really surprised to see you using GCC instrinsics (e.g. __sync_fetch_and_add). I'd say, these should be unneeded with c++11? –  sehe Nov 13 '11 at 22:35
    
@sehe: I implemented the version using GCC intrinsics when the one using atomics didn't work for comparison purposes (aka if both didn't work I would have assumed there is something really wrong with my algorithm) –  Grizzly Nov 13 '11 at 22:42
    
Isn't there a race condition in the if load then store? Shouldn't this be an if (x.exchange(1)) or something like that? –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '11 at 22:43
    
@Kerrek SB: not really since the if is not even required there, store(1) without the if should work just as well, since lock is set to 1 there and only set back after every thread in the barrier has passed this. The if(lock.load()) is only there to avoid unnecerry write access to the cacheline (now that I think of it I could start set the next lock to 1 in the if(val >= thread_count - 1) part to get the same effect –  Grizzly Nov 14 '11 at 0:13
    
@Grizzly: I think you're right, I wasn't reading it carefully enough. –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 0:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks needlessly complicated. Try this simpler version (well, I haven't tested it, I just meditated on it:))) :

#include <atomic>

class spinning_barrier
{
public:
    spinning_barrier (unsigned int n) : n_ (n), nwait_ (0), step_(0) {}

    bool wait ()
    {
        unsigned int step = step_.load ();

        if (nwait_.fetch_add (1) == n_ - 1)
        {
            /* OK, last thread to come.  */
            nwait_.store (0); // XXX: maybe can use relaxed ordering here ??
            step_.fetch_add (1);
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            /* Run in circles and scream like a little girl.  */
            while (step_.load () == step)
                ;
            return false;
        }
    }

protected:
    /* Number of synchronized threads. */
    const unsigned int n_;

    /* Number of threads currently spinning.  */
    std::atomic<unsigned int> nwait_;

    /* Number of barrier syncronizations completed so far, 
     * it's OK to wrap.  */
    std::atomic<unsigned int> step_;
};

EDIT: @Grizzy, I can't find any errors in your first (C++11) version and I've also run it for like a hundred million syncs with two threads and it completes. I've run it on a dual-socket/quad-core GNU/Linux machine though, so I'm rather inclined to suspect your option 3. - the library (or rather, its port to win32) is not mature enough.

share|improve this answer
    
nice work - though I never think of screaming girls while meditating –  sehe Nov 14 '11 at 11:19
    
@sehe, oh noes, he did it! He messed with my holy GNU formatting! :P –  chill Nov 14 '11 at 12:33
    
Huh. I read lots of GNU code, I'm pretty sure I haven't seen those half-indents. Now, it could be an SO artifact, or just my sense of direction when making my way through GNU code :) Ok, I'll be more conservative next time –  sehe Nov 14 '11 at 12:40
    
I woukdn't say my version is that muc more complecated, but that version does look nicer, so thanks for that. Unfortunately it seems to have the same problems as my original version (just did a quick test, need to verify some more to be sure) –  Grizzly Nov 14 '11 at 12:49

I have no idea if this is going to be of help, but the following snippet from Herb Sutter's implementation of a wait-free queue uses a spinlock based on atomics:

std::atomic<bool> consumerLock;

{  // the critical section
  while (consumerLock.exchange(true)) { } // this is the spinlock

  // do something useful

  consumerLock = false; // unlock
}
share|improve this answer
2  
oh - so much more peaceful on the eyes. Fewer than 6 -> and __ per square inch is a blessing. And, you can have whitespace too! I'll think I'll go and clean up that OP –  sehe Nov 13 '11 at 22:51
    
Thanks :-) The actual queue is actually pretty neat, too. It's on Dr Dobbs, Measuring Parallel Performance: Optimizing a Concurrent Queue. –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '11 at 22:52
    
I've seen it! One of those warning posts (stay away from hand-rolled lock-free unless...). I prefer using TBB or LibCds (PS. formatted OP) –  sehe Nov 13 '11 at 22:56
    
@sehe: But what choice is there other than hand-rolled? I saw LibCds, is it any good? Doxygen makes my skin crawl... There's some guy who made "Boost lockfree", which is not part of Boost, but again no idea how good it is. Is TBB general C++, or only for Intel compiler? –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '11 at 22:58
    
LibCds is pretty darn good. It has maps, stacks, queues, order lists with a number of (generic pluggable) garbage collection strategies. The threading library can be plugged (i use pthreads) and the most important reason why it isn't in boost, is potential licensing issues with the algorithms, IIRC. Edit Following the link to Boost lockfree, I remember seeing some conversation between the developer of LibCds and Tim Blechmann about implementation specifics and possible inclusion in boost. –  sehe Nov 13 '11 at 23:03

Here is a simple version of mine :

// spinning_mutex.hpp
#include <atomic>


class spinning_mutex
{
private:
    std::atomic<bool> lockVal;
public:
    spinning_mutex() : lockVal(false) { };

    void lock()
    {
        while(lockVal.exchange(true) );
    } 

    void unlock()
    {
        lockVal.store(false);
    }

    bool is_locked()
    {
        return lockVal.load();
    }
};

Usage : (from std::lock_guard example)

#include <thread>
#include <mutex>
#include "spinning_mutex.hpp"

int g_i = 0;
spinning_mutex g_i_mutex;  // protects g_i

void safe_increment()
{
    std::lock_guard<spinning_mutex> lock(g_i_mutex);
    ++g_i;

    // g_i_mutex is automatically released when lock
    // goes out of scope
}

int main()
{
    std::thread t1(safe_increment);
    std::thread t2(safe_increment);

    t1.join();
    t2.join();
}
share|improve this answer
    
spinning_locker can likely be replaced by std::lock_guard –  Nathan Binkert Dec 11 '12 at 2:18
    
@ali_bahoo your implementation is almost correct. Almost, because here: bool expected = false; while(!lockVal.compare_exchange_strong( expected,true ) ); after the first call to compare_exchange_strong, the value of expected becomes true, and on the subsequent spins, the lock will let any thread through. Check out the std::atomic<> reference. Correct way would be: bool expected = false; while(!lockVal.compare_exchange_strong( expected,true ) ) expected = false; –  IneQuation Dec 31 '13 at 17:59
    
@IneQuation: No. expected is not a class member. Each thread entering the Lock() method will face a new expected variable. It is just a value on the stack, that will be cleaned up when exiting the Lock() method. So you do not have to set it to false. –  ali_bahoo Jan 2 '14 at 9:52
    
No, @ali_bahoo, you are wrong. :) You may also test your code, it doesn't work as intended, and this is because the value of expected on the stack is being overwritten by compare_exchange_strong. The reference I linked says: "Compares the contents of the contained value with expected: - if true, it replaces the contained value with val (like store). - if false, it replaces expected with the contained value ." This breaks expected for the next loop iteration. –  IneQuation Jan 3 '14 at 9:26
1  
@IneQuation God! What was I thinking? For this purpose, better approach is to use std::atomic::exchange() instead of compare_exchange_strong. It is simpler. –  ali_bahoo Jan 6 '14 at 13:09

Why not use std::atomic_flag (from C++11)?

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/atomic/atomic_flag

std::atomic_flag is an atomic boolean type. Unlike all specializations of std::atomic, it is guaranteed to be lock-free.

Here's how I would write my spinning thread barrier class:

#ifndef SPINLOCK_H
#define SPINLOCK_H

#include <atomic>
#include <thread>

class SpinLock
{
public:

    inline SpinLock() :
        m_lock(ATOMIC_FLAG_INIT)
    {
    }

    inline SpinLock(const SpinLock &) :
        m_lock(ATOMIC_FLAG_INIT)
    {
    }

    inline SpinLock &operator=(const SpinLock &)
    {
        return *this;
    }

    inline void lock()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            for (int32_t i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
            {
                if (!m_lock.test_and_set(std::memory_order_acquire))
                {
                    return;
                }
            }

            std::this_thread::yield();  // A great idea that you don't see in many spinlock examples
        }
    }

    inline bool try_lock()
    {
        return !m_lock.test_and_set(std::memory_order_acquire);
    }

    inline void unlock()
    {
        m_lock.clear(std::memory_order_release);
    }

private:

    std::atomic_flag m_lock;
};

#endif
share|improve this answer

I know the thread is a little bit old, but since it is still the first google result when searching for a thread barrier using c++11 only, I want to present a solution that gets rid of the busy waiting using the std::condition_variable. Basically it is the solution of chill, but instead of the while loop it is using std::conditional_variable.wait() and std::conditional_variable.notify_all(). In my tests it seems to work fine.

#include <atomic>
#include <condition_variable>
#include <mutex>


class SpinningBarrier
{
    public:
        SpinningBarrier (unsigned int threadCount) :
            threadCnt(threadCount),
            step(0),
            waitCnt(0)
        {}

        bool wait()
        {
            if(waitCnt.fetch_add(1) >= threadCnt - 1)
            {
                std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
                step += 1;

                condVar.notify_all();
                waitCnt.store(0);
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
                unsigned char s = step;

                condVar.wait(lock, [&]{return step == s;});
                return false;
            }
        }
    private:
        const unsigned int threadCnt;
        unsigned char step;

        std::atomic<unsigned int> waitCnt;
        std::condition_variable condVar;
        std::mutex mutex;
};
share|improve this answer
    
This is fine but I think the point of the thread was the spinlock. –  Mikhail May 15 '13 at 2:03
    
spinlocks are typically lockless (free of mutex) –  mchiasson Feb 15 at 3:58

Here is an elegant solution from the book C++ Concurrency in Action: Practical Multithreading.

struct bar_t {
    unsigned const count;
    std::atomic<unsigned> spaces;
    std::atomic<unsigned> generation;
    bar_t(unsigned count_) :
        count(count_), spaces(count_), generation(0)
    {}
    void wait() {
        unsigned const my_generation = generation;
        if (!--spaces) {
            spaces = count;
            ++generation;
        } else {
            while(generation == my_generation);
        }
    }
};
share|improve this answer

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