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It is beyond me at this point. I'm trying to create an interface that looks something like this.

type IFetchData = 
     abstract FetchData: string -> seq<'a>

The above declaration is valid (and compiles) but when I go to use it I get a compile time error. This expression was expected to have type 'a but here has type "what I'm currently trying to return" i.e. seq.

My example usage however looks like the following:

type SampleFetchData() =
    interface IFetchData with
        member self.FetchData str =           
           seq {
                    for letter in str do
                        yield letter // compile error here
                }

I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong. All I'd like to do is allow the interface implementer to be able to write any function that returns a generic sequence either seq<string>,seq<int>,seq<record type here>, seq<union type here>, etc.

Can someone tell me what I'm missing here?

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

If you're loading the interface implementation using Reflection, then it is going to be quite difficult to work with it. The problem is that you get an object of type obj. You know that it implements IFetchData<'T> for some 'T, but statically, you don't know for which 'T. This is a problem because you can't cast the object to any more specific type - if you tried using IFetchData<obj>, it wouldn't work because you can't cast, for example, IFetchData<int> to that type.

I would recommend using a non-generic interface, which is quite common .NET pattern:

type IFetchDataUntyped = 
  abstract FetchData : string -> System.Collections.IEnumerable

type IFetchData<'T> =  
  inherit IFetchDataUntyped
  abstract FetchData : string -> seq<'T> 

When you load an implementation using Reflection, you can cast the object to IFetchDataUntyped and work with it in a fairly reasonable way (using Seq.cast to convert the sequence to a more specific type if you know the element type).

Depending on your application, you may also just make the FetchData method a generic method and keep the interface non-generic. Then you could cast dynamically loaded objects to the interface and invoke the method. However, this changes the design (because the method has to work for any type it gets as a type parameter):

type IFetchData =  
  abstract FetchData<'T> : string -> seq<'T>  // Note: Generic parameter here!
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tomas! I'll have to give it a try. Ultimately what I'm trying to accomplish is loading the assembly, create an instance of the type which ends up being obj and then cast to interface to invoke the method. I then want to take the result (some seq<'T>) and store away for later use down stream. It will ultimately be passed in to another function for processing... it's that destination functions job to know the type of the seq. Thanks again! –  cameron Nov 16 '11 at 16:39

You need to do something like

type IFetchData<'a> = 
     abstract FetchData: string -> seq<'a>

type SampleFetchData() =
    interface IFetchData<char> with
        member self.FetchData str =           
           seq {
                    for letter in str do
                        yield letter 
                }

i.e. the interface needs to be made generic. If you want to avoid the genericness you could use some inline constraints, rather than an interface

EDIT: Inline magic version

let inline Fetchdata string obj=
   (^a: (member FetchData: string -> seq<'b> )(obj, string))

type SampleFetchData() =
        member self.FetchData str =           
           seq {
                    for letter in str do
                        yield letter 
                }

Fetchdata "hello" (new SampleFetchData())
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response John. I was afraid of that. I did get it to work using your response above but the ultimate use of this is via reflection. And that's where the next problem is. For some reason I'm having trouble dynamically loading and invoking the member above due to the genericness of the interface. I was hoping I would not have to make the interface generic but still have a generic function. :) –  cameron Nov 13 '11 at 23:49
    
I have updated with the inline version which may be better, depending on how your reflection works. –  John Palmer Nov 14 '11 at 0:10
    
Wow! Very Cool! My reflection is very old school at the moment. I basically map over a given type's interfaces to determine if it implements the interface above and if it does then I create an instance of it and try to cast it to the interface above and finally invoke the fetch data member. With your example above I shouldn't have to cast I could just call the inline function above with the reflected type and parameters. I think that's right? :) –  cameron Nov 14 '11 at 1:52
    
@cameron - you can call the inline function on any object as long as the type is known at compile time –  John Palmer Nov 14 '11 at 2:11
    
That's awesome!! Thanks again @John –  cameron Nov 14 '11 at 2:17

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