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Consider the following :

cAxes = {{{0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 1}}, {{0, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}, {{0, 0,0}, {1, 0, 0}}};

Graphics3D[{Line /@ cAxes}, Boxed -> False]

enter image description here

How can Style differently the 3 lines ?

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@Yoda, Thank You ! –  500 Nov 13 '11 at 23:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The answer above are good, but I want to show some alternatives.

I show that it is possible to use Style for this, and that Tube is an interesting alternative to Line.

cAxes = {{{0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 1}}, {{0, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}, {{0, 0, 
     0}, {1, 0, 0}}};

tubes = Tube@# ~Style~ #2 & ~MapThread~ {cAxes, {Red, Green, Blue}};

Graphics3D[tubes, Boxed -> False]

enter image description here

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Could I send you something a little demo I am preparing ? I am struggling with some Graphics, but the code is to long ! –  500 Nov 14 '11 at 17:54
1  
@500 Yes, go ahead. I should be able to spend some time on it today. –  Mr.Wizard Nov 14 '11 at 20:30
    
+1 for infix notation ~MapThread~, that makes it "look" much more like the way that it works. –  Daniel Chisholm Nov 15 '11 at 12:17
    
@Daniel, thank you. I like to use infix notation a lot. It has the significant advantage of letting me quickly know that the function is handling exactly two arguments, much as @ or // indicate a single argument. I would actually write the Style function above as Tube@# ~Style~ #2 & but I feared that others unfamiliar with infix would find it confusing. Since this is not the first time I have received positive comments about infix however, I am going to stop worrying and use it liberally. –  Mr.Wizard Nov 15 '11 at 21:08

Here's an example:

colors = {Red, Green, Blue};
style = {Dashed, DotDashed, Dotted};
cAxes = {{{0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 1}}, {{0, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}, {{0, 0, 
     0}, {1, 0, 0}}};
Graphics3D[{#1, #2, Line@#3} & @@@ Transpose@{colors, style, cAxes}, 
 Boxed -> False]

enter image description here

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You could also use MapThread:

cAxes = {{{0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 1}}, {{0, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}, {{0, 0, 0}, {1, 0, 0}}};

Graphics3D[{
   MapThread[{#1, Line[#2]} &, {{Red, Blue, Green}, cAxes}]
   }, Boxed -> False]
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Also remember that you can do the same with Plot3D if you need it:

colors = {Red, Green, Blue};
style = {Dashed, DotDashed, Dotted};
Plot3D[{}, {x, 0, 10}, {y, 0, 10}, 
 AxesLabel -> {x, y, z}, 
 AxesStyle -> Directive /@ Transpose@{colors, style}, 
 Boxed     -> False]
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I am trying to decide if this is a good answer. It is not clear to me if 500 wants to style axes, or simply chose those lines as an example. –  Mr.Wizard Nov 14 '11 at 0:23
    
@Mr. I don't know whether it is a good answer or not. I think of it just as a reminder of another possibility. –  belisarius Nov 14 '11 at 0:40
1  
Okay, I like possibilities. +1 ;-) –  Mr.Wizard Nov 14 '11 at 1:35

Untested (I don't have access to Mathematica right now):

Graphics3D[Transpose@{{Red, Green, Blue}, Line /@ cAxes}, Boxed -> False]
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celtschk, congratulations on being the top new user this month as of today! stackexchange.com/leagues/1/month/stackoverflow –  Mr.Wizard Nov 15 '11 at 22:37
1  
@Mr.Wizard: Thanks for notifying me about this. And also thanks for fixing the mistake in my code. –  celtschk Nov 15 '11 at 22:45

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