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I have this SQL expression:

SELECT Musclegroups.Name, COUNT(DISTINCT Workouts.WorkoutID) AS Expr1
FROM   Workouts INNER JOIN
       Series ON Workouts.WorkoutID = Series.WorkoutID INNER JOIN
       Exercises ON Series.ExerciseID = Exercises.ExerciseID INNER JOIN
       Musclegroups ON Musclegroups.MusclegroupID = Exercises.MusclegroupID
GROUP BY Musclegroups.Name

Since Im working on a project which uses EF in a WCF Ria LinqToEntitiesDomainService, I have to query this with LINQ (If this isn't a must then pls inform me). I made this expression:

var WorkoutCountPerMusclegroup = (from s in ObjectContext.Series1
                                 join w in ObjectContext.Workouts on s.WorkoutID equals w.WorkoutID
                                 where w.UserID.Equals(userid) && w.Type.Equals("WeightLifting")
                                 group s by s.Exercise.Musclegroup into g                                              
                                 select new StringKeyIntValuePair
                                 {
                                      TestID = g.Select(n => n.Exercise.MusclegroupID).FirstOrDefault(),                                                  
                                      Key = g.Select(n => n.Exercise.Musclegroup.Name).FirstOrDefault(),
                                      Value = g.Select(n => n.WorkoutID).Distinct().Count()
                                 });

The StringKeyIntValuePair is just a custom Entity type I made so I can send down the info to the Silverlight client. Also this is why I need to set an "TestID" for it, as it is an entity and it needs one.

And the problem is, that this linq query produces this horrible SQL statement: http://pastebay.com/144532

I suppose there is a better way to query this information, a better linq expression maybe. Or is it possible to just query with plain SQL somehow?

EDIT:

I realized that the TestID is unnecessary because the other property named "Key" (the one on which Im grouping) becomes the key of the group, so it will be a key also. And after this, my query looks like this:

var WorkoutCountPerMusclegroup = (from s in ObjectContext.Series1
                                          join w in ObjectContext.Workouts on s.WorkoutID equals w.WorkoutID
                                          where w.UserID.Equals(userid) && w.Type.Equals("WeightLifting")
                                          group w.WorkoutID by s.Exercise.Musclegroup.Name into g                                              
                                          select new StringKeyIntValuePair
                                          {                                                                                                   
                                              Key = g.Key,
                                              Value = g.Select(n => n).Distinct().Count()
                                          });

This produces the following SQL: http://pastebay.com/144545

This seems far better then the previous sql statement of the half-baked linq query. But is this good enough? Or this is the boundary of LinqToEntities capabilities, and if I want even more clear sql, I should make another DomainService which operates with LinqToSQL or something else?

Or the best way would be using a stored procedure, that returns Rowsets? If so, is there a best practice to do this asynchronously, like a simple WCF Ria DomainService query?

share|improve this question
    
the Select(n=>n) looks redundant - can't you can simply use g.Distinct().Count()? Also, what benefit do you get from a linq statement that generates cleaner sql? – saus Nov 14 '11 at 2:59
    
You're correct, g.Distinct().Count() is enough, thank you for that. About the benefit, I think a cleaner sql results in a better /(less complex) query execution plan, which means faster response from the server. I know that using linq2Entities the performance will not be as good as in linq2sql or others in most cases, but if it is possible to make a linq query that saves a few milisecs compared to another, then why not use it? :) – Szabó Bálint Nov 14 '11 at 12:15
    
I agree, as long as it doesn't impact the readability of your linq - since that is the part that you (or someone else) will need to maintain. But certainly, all other things being equal, the query that generates cleaner sql is superior. – saus Nov 14 '11 at 22:49

I would like to know best practices as well.

Compiling of lambda expression linq can take a lot of time (3–30s), especially using group by and then FirstOrDefault (for left inner joins meaning only taking values from the first row in the group).

The generated sql excecution might not be that bad but the compilation using DbContext which cannot be precompiled with .NET 4.0.

As an example 1 something like:

 var q = from a in DbContext.A
     join b ... into bb from b in bb.DefaultIfEmtpy()
     group new { a, b } by new { ... } into g
     select new 
     { 
        g.Key.Name1
        g.Sum(p => p.b.Salary)
        g.FirstOrDefault().b.SomeDate
     };

Each FirstOrDefault we added in one case caused +2s compile time which added up 3 times = 6s only to compile not load data (which takes less than 500ms). This basically destroys your application's usability. The user will be waiting many times for no reason.

The only way we found so far to speed up the compilation is to mix lambda expression with object expression (might not be the correct notation).

Example 2: refactoring of previous example 1.

var q = (from a in DbContext.A
     join b ... into bb from b in bb.DefaultIfEmtpy()
     select new { a, b })
     .GroupBy(p => new { ... })
     .Select(g => new 
        { 
           g.Key.Name1
           g.Sum(p => p.b.Salary)
           g.FirstOrDefault().b.SomeDate
        });

The above example did compile a lot faster than example 1 in our case but still not fast enough so the only solution for us in response-critical areas is to revert to native SQL (to Entities) or using views or stored procedures (in our case Oracle PL/SQL).

Once we have time we are going to test if precompilation works in .NET 4.5 and/or .NET 5.0 for DbContext.

Hope this helps and we can get other solutions.

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