Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please consider :

colors = {Red, Green, Blue};
style = {Thickness[.01], Thickness[.01], Thickness[.01]};
cAxes = {{{0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 1}}, {{0, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0}}, {{0, 0, 
 0}, {1, 0, 0}}};

Graphics3D[{{#1, #2, Line@#3} & @@@ Transpose@{colors, style, cAxes}, 
Blue, Specularity[White, 3], Sphere[{.5, .5, .5}, .1]}, 
Boxed -> False, FaceGrids -> All, 
FaceGridsStyle -> Directive[Black, Dashed]]

Using Yoda`s solution on How to Style Lines

How could I color the Sphere using GrayLevel (I will manipulate it later).

And How could I have denser FaceGrids ? 10 Lines horizontally & Vertically. I also don`t understand why the Edges one are distant to one another.

enter image description here

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's always good practice to group the graphics object and its styles in a list, in case you need to quickly add another one with different styles. By that, I mean write it as {Blue, Specularity[White, 3], Sphere[{.5, .5, .5}, .1]}. Now you can easily add a GrayLevel term before Sphere and it'll work.

For the FaceGrids, I believe you'll have to manually define the lines at your desired spacing for each face. Here's an example for showing how to do it for one face.

Graphics3D[{{#1, #2, Line@#3} & @@@ 
   Transpose@{colors, style, cAxes}, {Blue, GrayLevel[0.3], Lighting -> "Neutral",
   Specularity[White, 3], Sphere[{.5, .5, .5}, .1]}}, Boxed -> False, 
 FaceGrids -> {{{0, 0, 1}, 
    Transpose@({#, #} & /@ Range[0, 1, 0.1])}}, 
 FaceGridsStyle -> Directive[Black, Dashed]]

enter image description here

The faces are defined as ±1 for the corresponding plane and the other two are zero. So {0,0,1} in my example corresponds to the z=1 plane.

The list supplied to FaceGrids can be easily computed for each face, instead of manually entering them, but I'll leave that to you :)

EDIT:

Since you want a uniform mesh all around, define where you want the grid lines drawn as

gridList = Transpose@({#, #} & /@ Range[0, 1, 0.1]);

Then, use the following for FaceGrids:

FaceGrids -> Join @@ Table[{RotateLeft[j {0, 0, 1}, i], gridList}, 
    {i, {0, 1, 2}}, {j, {-1, 1}}]

Here's how the result should look like with PlotRangePadding -> None:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
This time you beat me to it :-) –  Verbeia Nov 14 '11 at 0:19
    
Thank You, however I want this sphere to be in Black & White basically. Is it possible ? –  500 Nov 14 '11 at 0:23
    
Ah the lighting -> Neutral Does it ! –  500 Nov 14 '11 at 0:26
    
@Yoda, What am I doing wrong :-) ? : FaceGrids -> {{#, Transpose@({#, #} & /@ Range[0, 1, 0.1])}} & /@ {{0, 0, 1}, {0, 0, -1}} –  500 Nov 14 '11 at 1:28
    
@Yoda, FaceGrids -> Function[ou, {ou, Transpose@({#, #} & /@ Range[0, 1, 0.1])}] /@ {{0, 0, 1}, {0, 0, -1}} . This is the only thing I could do :-( It does not take any other value than 0 or -1 :-( –  500 Nov 14 '11 at 1:55

In addition to Yoda's response:

  • Lighting -> "Neutral" will allow grayscale object to show up as gray instead of with various colors.

  • PlotRangePadding -> None will remove the spaces on the grid lines (depending on the setting for PlotRange.)

share|improve this answer

Yoda beat me to typing out the FaceGrids setting (see documentation). But here is an alternative.

Instead of setting the FaceGrids setting explicitly, youcould also try setting FrameTicks, since by default the FaceGrids follow these, and then style the FrameTicks to be invisible using Opacity.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.